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Thread: How the brain creates the experience of time

  1. #61
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    Note that the brain has to be able to "see" both sides of the timeline (at once) to be able to link causes with effects.

    Not only that, but it has to be able to "see" both the outside and the inside of the light cone, to determine what is "possible" - and more specifically what is "im"possible.

    The space D covers the entire light cone, it's like the piece of paper on which the picture is drawn. It encompasses both possible and impossible events. (That is to say, before learning, there is no distinction between what is possible and what is not).

    A process is needed that moves information around within D and "connects" it with other information.

    And, if you were a computer scientist and you had to come up with an architecture that does this, you'd come up with... a brain! Memory buffer on the left, forming directional connections with points in a universe of possibilities, which are on the right 'cause they haven't been instantiated yet.
    Last edited by nonsqtr; 09-25-2020 at 01:05 AM.

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    A question to ponder:

    If you can instantiate behavior by "placing" a neural signal along timeline, does it matter how that signal got there?

    In other words - let us suppose, that we are talking about the cross-brain EM field scenario, where the information takes a fraction of a nanosecond to get from the frontal lobe to the occipital lobe.

    Now let us suppose, that reason the frontal neuron fired in the first place, was because of input from some other neuron Z, and neuron Z has connections arranged in such a way that it always stimulates the occipital neuron 1 microsecond after the frontal neuron. Thus, information is arriving at the occipital pole "faster than it's supposed to".

    The requirement for a stochastic unfolding is that the "advance" information be instantiable as an expectation.

    And that is exactly what we have in the brain.

    As far as our brains are concerned, it makes no difference whether a signal occurs "because of" a neural connection or "because of" an EM distortion, it still occurs. And that is precisely why this works, because at some point the brain "can not tell the difference". The expectation becomes equivalent to the neural signal, "in the limit" as the width of the time interval approaches zero.

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