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Guest
06-13-2013, 10:38 AM
http://www.dallasnews.com/news/politics/headlines/20130609-ted-cruz-launches-effort-to-abolish-irs-but-tax-experts-call-him-confused.ece

Won't happen because it will put CPAs out of business.

“I’ll give you the simplest answer to this IRS scandal, which is abolish the IRS,” Cruz told a GOP dinner audience recently in New York, echoing a TV spot in which he tries to raise funds for conservative Senate candidates.


It’s a bold prescription that meshes with Cruz’s persona as a brash change agent. It drew cheers from a well-heeled Manhattan crowd. But as policy from a U.S. senator, it strikes liberal critics as demagoguery, and tax experts as half-baked.


Even a smaller government needs to collect revenue and enforce tax laws, after all.
“He’s expressing the frustration of a lot of people with the IRS. But step one is to reform or ditch the tax code, and step two is to create a more neutral or well-functioning tax authority,” said Chris Edwards, director of tax policy studies at the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank. “Just calling for blowing up the IRS is maybe not starting in the best place.”


Calls to revamp the code and curb the IRS have grown louder since the scandal involving heavy-handed treatment of conservative groups was revealed. Cruz stands apart. Even among tea partiers, demands to downsize the agency are more the norm than demands to scrap it entirely.


Cruz spokeswoman Catherine Frazier argued that abolishing the IRS “is the end goal.” She said it would be a natural outcome once the tax code is made simpler and fairer.
“We don’t need this terribly complicated tax code that is sucking Americans’ time and money and is creating this terribly overbearing and intrusive federal agency,” she said. “Americans understand that.”


But in railing against the IRS, Cruz puts the emphasis on abolishing the agency. Even on his website, there’s no fine print explaining how he envisions the government operating without a tax enforcement agency.


And since taking office five months ago, Cruz has embraced both a national sales tax and a simplified income tax — competing ideas for replacing the current tax code. Each requires enforcement of some sort, especially the flat tax Cruz generally promotes, because taxpayers would self-report earnings, major deductions and how much they owe.

Trinnity
06-13-2013, 10:41 AM
I'm all for it.

Coolwalker
06-13-2013, 11:20 AM
National Sales tax is the answer. No more money taken from your paycheck, but all federal taxes should come from a National sales Tax on all goods and services. Individuals should pay a flat 2%, companies a flat 4% and corporations a flat 8% on anything purchased...anything! No one gets money back at the end of the year, there are no loopholes. If a company or corporation purchases anything from overseas, then they should pay an additional 15%. To finish this and make it the perfect scenario, all bills brought before congress or the senate should not be allowed to have any riders attached. Then all "pork spending" would magically disappear. To put the icing on the cake, all new drugs that are beneficial to the cdontinuance of human life should be moved to a fast-track of no more than 18 months after initial testing proves that the benefits greatly outweigh the downside.

Dante1
06-13-2013, 11:20 AM
http://www.dallasnews.com/news/politics/headlines/20130609-ted-cruz-launches-effort-to-abolish-irs-but-tax-experts-call-him-confused.ece

Won't happen because it will put CPAs out of business.

“I’ll give you the simplest answer to this IRS scandal, which is abolish the IRS,” Cruz told a GOP dinner audience recently in New York, echoing a TV spot in which he tries to raise funds for conservative Senate candidates.


It’s a bold prescription that meshes with Cruz’s persona as a brash change agent. It drew cheers from a well-heeled Manhattan crowd. But as policy from a U.S. senator, it strikes liberal critics as demagoguery, and tax experts as half-baked.


Even a smaller government needs to collect revenue and enforce tax laws, after all.
“He’s expressing the frustration of a lot of people with the IRS. But step one is to reform or ditch the tax code, and step two is to create a more neutral or well-functioning tax authority,” said Chris Edwards, director of tax policy studies at the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank. “Just calling for blowing up the IRS is maybe not starting in the best place.”


Calls to revamp the code and curb the IRS have grown louder since the scandal involving heavy-handed treatment of conservative groups was revealed. Cruz stands apart. Even among tea partiers, demands to downsize the agency are more the norm than demands to scrap it entirely.


Cruz spokeswoman Catherine Frazier argued that abolishing the IRS “is the end goal.” She said it would be a natural outcome once the tax code is made simpler and fairer.
“We don’t need this terribly complicated tax code that is sucking Americans’ time and money and is creating this terribly overbearing and intrusive federal agency,” she said. “Americans understand that.”


But in railing against the IRS, Cruz puts the emphasis on abolishing the agency. Even on his website, there’s no fine print explaining how he envisions the government operating without a tax enforcement agency.


And since taking office five months ago, Cruz has embraced both a national sales tax and a simplified income tax — competing ideas for replacing the current tax code. Each requires enforcement of some sort, especially the flat tax Cruz generally promotes, because taxpayers would self-report earnings, major deductions and how much they owe.

Cruz's heart is in the right place, but his brain isn't.

Politicians in Washington have been drooling over a national sales tax, or a consumption tax, for decades. Nothing would please them more than to institute yet another tax regime on top of the income tax.

Once they accomplish a second tax regime, promising to lower income taxes, they can quickly restore income tax rates to where they were, and then collect TWO taxes on everybody, the sales tax AND the income tax.

I am against any new tax regime, because I wouldn't trust any people in the Washington industry as far as I could throw them.

Dante.

hoytmonger
06-13-2013, 11:22 AM
Rep. John Linder and Neal Boortz wrote the Fair Tax Book, a consumption tax to replace income, payroll, capital gains , gift, estate and corporate taxes with an across the board consumption tax. My only issue with it is the 'prebate', which I find objectionable.

The IRS should be eliminated, as it's unconstitutional to begin with. The IRS is part of the Executive Branch and only Congress can lay and collect taxes. The 16th amendment is also unconstitutional as 3/4 of the states didn't legally ratify it.

Coolwalker
06-13-2013, 12:13 PM
Rep. John Linder and Neal Boortz wrote the Fair Tax Book, a consumption tax to replace income, payroll, capital gains , gift, estate and corporate taxes with an across the board consumption tax. My only issue with it is the 'prebate', which I find objectionable.

The IRS should be eliminated, as it's unconstitutional to begin with. The IRS is part of the Executive Branch and only Congress can lay and collect taxes. The 16th amendment is also unconstitutional as 3/4 of the states didn't legally ratify it.

There is no need for the IRS if a National Sals Tax is in place. There is no one to check up on, no one to chase down for back taxes, nothing. It is the simplest form of taxation and the most equatable.

garyo
06-13-2013, 12:41 PM
The supreme court ruled the income tax unconstitutional in 1894.