User Tag List

Page 149 of 149 FirstFirst ... 4999139142143144145146147148149
Results 1,481 to 1,489 of 1489

Thread: Our Daily Bread

  1. #1481
    Alumni Member& VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Old Ridge Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,854
    Thanks
    39,280
    Thanked: 7,005
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21474851
    Tuesday, August 7, 2018

    Let us then approach God’s throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need. Hebrews 4:16

    During the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, more people were looking for work than there were jobs available. I was one of those job seekers. After nine anxious months, I landed employment as a copywriter. But the company soon fell on bad times and I was jobless again.**

    Ever been there? It seems like the worst is over when suddenly the bottom drops out on you. The widow at Zarephath could relate (1 Kings 17:12). Due to a famine, she was preparing the last meal for herself and her son when the prophet Elijah requested a bite to eat. She reluctantly agreed and God provided a continuous supply of flour and oil (vv. 10–16).

    But then her son fell ill. His health declined until he stopped breathing. The widow cried out, “What do you have against me, man of God? Did you come to remind me of my sin and kill my son?” (v. 18).

    At times, we may want to respond like the widow—wondering if God is punishing us. We forget that bad things can happen in this fallen world.

    Elijah took the concern to God, praying earnestly and honestly for the boy, and God raised him up! (vv. 20–22).

    When the bottom drops out on us, may we—like Elijah—realize that the faithful One will not desert us! We can rest in God’s purposes as we pray for understanding.

    For help on the topic of peace, read discoveryseries.org/q1126.

    God is good in both the good times and the bad.** By Poh Fang Chia

    INSIGHT:It can be easy to think that life will go well if we do everything we’re supposed to do. But today’s story reminds us that life isn’t a formula. The widow was faithful and obedient, and yet her son died. But we can be encouraged that there’s nothing too hard for God, for He is the one who can even bring the dead back to life (v. 23).

    Are you feeling overwhelmed? Commit your situation to our faithful God.**

    For more about the book of Kings, check out our free online course at christianuniversity.org/OT219.

    J.R. Hudberg
    1 Kings 17:15-24

    15*She went away and did as Elijah had told her. So there was food every day for Elijah and for the woman and her family. 16*For the jar of flour was not used up and the jug of oil did not run dry, in keeping with the word of the Lord spoken by Elijah.

    17*Some time later the son of the woman who owned the house became ill. He grew worse and worse, and finally stopped breathing. 18*She said to Elijah, “What do you have against me, man of God? Did you come to remind me of my sin and kill my son?”

    19*“Give me your son,” Elijah replied. He took him from her arms, carried him to the upper room where he was staying, and laid him on his bed. 20*Then he cried out to the Lord, “Lord my God, have you brought tragedy even on this widow I am staying with, by causing her son to die?” 21*Then he stretched himself out on the boy three times and cried out to the Lord, “Lord my God, let this boy’s life return to him!”

    22*The Lord heard Elijah’s cry, and the boy’s life returned to him, and he lived. 23*Elijah picked up the child and carried him down from the room into the house. He gave him to his mother and said, “Look, your son is alive!”

    24*Then the woman said to Elijah, “Now I know that you are a man of God and that the word of the Lord from your mouth is the truth.”

    Cross references:1 Kings 17:18 : Lk 5:8 1 Kings 17:20 : 2Ki 4:33 1 Kings 17:21 : 2Ki 4:34; Ac 20:10 1 Kings 17:23 : Heb 11:35 1 Kings 17:24 : Jn 16:30 1 Kings 17:24 : ver 18 1 Kings 17:24 : 1Ki 22:16; Ps 119:43; Jn 17:17
    Humble yourself, for there is an enormous change coming.

  2. #1482
    Alumni Member& VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Old Ridge Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,854
    Thanks
    39,280
    Thanked: 7,005
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21474851
    Wednesday, August 8, 2018

    My heart’s desire and prayer to God for the Israelites is that they may be saved. Romans 10:1

    As a convert to Jesus Christ, Nabeel Qureshi has written books to help his readers understand the people in the religion he left. His tone is respectful, and Qureshi always displays a heart of love for his people.

    Qureshi dedicated one of his books to his sister, who has not yet put her faith in Jesus. The dedication is brief, but powerful. “I am begging God for the day that we can worship him together,” he wrote.

    We get a sense of that kind of love as we read Paul’s letter to the church in Rome. “My heart is filled with bitter sorrow and unending grief,” he said, “for my people, my Jewish brothers and sisters. I would be willing to be forever cursed—cut off from Christ!—if that would save them” (Romans 9:2–3 nlt).

    Paul loved the Jewish people so much that he would have chosen separation from God if only they would accept Christ. He understood that by rejecting Jesus, his people were rejecting the one true God. This motivated him to appeal to his readers to share the good news of Jesus with everyone (10:14–15).

    Today, may we prayerfully dedicate ourselves to the love that aches for those close to us!

    Father, we ask You to fill our hearts with Your love for others. We hold ______ up to You and beg for them to see the truth about Your Son Jesus.

    We must love*those for whom Christ died as well as those in whom Christ lives. By Tim Gustafson

    INSIGHT:Paul’s concern that his Jewish brothers and sisters would come to Christ echoes the heart and plan of the Father for both Jew and Gentile. Hebrews 2:9 tells us that Jesus “was made lower than the angels for a little while, [and is] now crowned with glory and honor because he suffered death, so that by the grace of God he might taste death for everyone.” God’s concern is for all to come to Him through the sacrifice of His Son. This idea resonates with Peter, who declared, “The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance” (2 Peter 3:9). Notice God’s great concern for this broken, rebellious world. Not only has He provided in Jesus a sufficient sacrifice, He also extends patient love to people who do not know Him. Truly, as John 3:16 says, this is evidence of a God who so loved this world that He would pay the greatest possible price to satisfy His desire to reach to us. This is the great good news of the gospel!

    Bill Crowder
    Romans 9:1-5

    Paul’s Anguish Over Israel

    9*I speak the truth in Christ—I am not lying, my conscience confirms it through the Holy Spirit— 2*I have great sorrow and unceasing anguish in my heart. 3*For I could wish that I myself were cursed and cut off from Christ for the sake of my people, those of my own race, 4*the people of Israel. Theirs is the adoption to sonship; theirs the divine glory, the covenants, the receiving of the law, the temple worship and the promises. 5*Theirs are the patriarchs, and from them is traced the human ancestry of the Messiah, who is God over all, forever praised! Amen.

    Footnotes:Romans 9:5 Or Messiah, who is over all. God be forever praised! Or Messiah. God who is over all be forever praised!

    Cross references:Romans 9:1 : Ps 15:2; 2Co 11:10; Gal 1:20; 1Ti 2:7 Romans 9:1 : S Ro 1:9 Romans 9:3 : Ex 32:32 Romans 9:3 : 1Co 12:3; 16:22 Romans 9:3 : S Ac 22:5 Romans 9:3 : Ro 11:14 Romans 9:4 : ver 6 Romans 9:4 : Ex 4:22; 6:7; Dt 7:6 Romans 9:4 : Heb 9:5 Romans 9:4 : Ge 17:2; Dt 4:13; Ac 3:25; Eph 2:12 Romans 9:4 : Ps 147:19 Romans 9:4 : Heb 9:1 Romans 9:4 : S Ac 13:32; S Gal 3:16 Romans 9:5 : Ro 11:28 Romans 9:5 : Mt 1:1-16; Ro 1:3 Romans 9:5 : Jn 1:1; Col 2:9 Romans 9:5 : Ro 1:25; 2Co 11:31
    Humble yourself, for there is an enormous change coming.

  3. #1483
    Alumni Member& VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Old Ridge Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,854
    Thanks
    39,280
    Thanked: 7,005
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21474851
    Thursday, August 9, 2018

    On my bed I remember you; I think of you through the watches of the night. Psalm 63:6

    When our son, Xavier, was younger, business trips often pulled my husband away from home. Though his father called often, there were rough nights when the calls alone didn’t comfort Xavier. To help soothe our son when he felt he needed his dad, I’d pull out our photo albums as he prepared for bedtime. I’d point out the images that showed them spending time together and ask, “Do you remember this?”

    Memory after memory encouraged our son, who often said, “I have a good daddy.”

    I understood Xavier’s need to be reminded of his father’s love when he couldn’t see him. Whenever I’m going through tough or lonely times, I too long to know I’m loved, especially by my heavenly Father.

    David proclaimed his deep yearning for God as he hid from his enemies in the desert (Psalm 63:1). Remembering his personal encounters with God’s limitless power and satisfying love led him to praise (vv. 2–5). Through his most difficult nights, David could still rejoice in his dependable Father’s loving care (vv. 6–8).

    During our dark times, when we feel as if God’s not there for us, we need reminders of who God is and how He’s demonstrated His love. Reflecting on our personal experiences with Him, as well as His actions recorded in Scripture, can affirm the countless ways our good Abba Father loves us.

    Lord, thanks for demonstrating Your endless love to Your people, in our lives and through the words You preserved in Scripture.

    Remembering God’s works, which reveal His character, reassures us of His love. By Xochitl Dixon

    INSIGHT:Do you ever wonder whether your faith could endure during hard times? Psalm 63 describes a relationship with God that is deep enough to sustain times so difficult that—literally or metaphorically—we experience life as a “dry and parched land where there is no water” (v. 1).

    A faith that is long-lasting is one in which experiencing God’s love is so precious it’s “better than life” (v. 3). Such an intimate relationship is sustained through ongoing communication “through the watches of the night” (v. 6)—a time which in the psalms points to vulnerable communication with God (see, for example, 4:4; 16:7; 119:55).

    Through cultivating such a relationship with God, when hard times come we will have a rich history to remember and cherish (63:2, 6). In this way we can trust God enough to cling to Him (vv. 7–8), confident that He’ll deliver us once more (vv. 9–11).

    Monica Brands
    Psalms 63

    Psalm 63A psalm of David. When he was in the Desert of Judah.

    1*You, God, are my God,
    earnestly I seek you;
    I thirst for you,
    my whole being longs for you,
    in a dry and parched land
    where there is no water.

    2*I have seen you in the sanctuary
    and beheld your power and your glory.
    3*Because your love is better than life,
    my lips will glorify you.
    4*I will praise you as long as I live,
    and in your name I will lift up my hands.
    5*I will be fully satisfied as with the richest of foods;
    with singing lips my mouth will praise you.

    6*On my bed I remember you;
    I think of you through the watches of the night.
    7*Because you are my help,
    I sing in the shadow of your wings.
    8*I cling to you;
    your right hand upholds me.

    9*Those who want to kill me will be destroyed;
    they will go down to the depths of the earth.
    10*They will be given over to the sword
    and become food for jackals.

    11*But the king will rejoice in God;
    all who swear by God will glory in him,
    while the mouths of liars will be silenced.

    Footnotes:Psalm 63:1 In Hebrew texts 63:1-11 is numbered 63:2-12.

    Cross references:Psalm 63:1 : Ps 42:2; 84:2 Psalm 63:1 : Ps 143:6 Psalm 63:2 : S Ps 15:1; 27:4; 68:24 Psalm 63:2 : S Ex 16:7 Psalm 63:3 : Ps 36:7; 69:16; 106:45; 109:21 Psalm 63:4 : Ps 104:33; 146:2; Isa 38:20 Psalm 63:4 : S Ps 28:2; 1Ti 2:8 Psalm 63:5 : S Ps 36:8; Mt 5:6 Psalm 63:6 : Dt 6:4-9; Ps 16:7; 119:148; Mt 14:25 Psalm 63:7 : Ps 27:9; 118:7 Psalm 63:7 : S Ru 2:12 Psalm 63:8 : S Nu 32:12; Hos 6:3 Psalm 63:8 : S Ps 41:12 Psalm 63:9 : Ps 40:14 Psalm 63:9 : Ps 55:15; 71:20; 95:4; 139:15 Psalm 63:10 : Jer 18:21; Eze 35:5; Am 1:11 Psalm 63:10 : La 5:18 Psalm 63:11 : Ps 21:1; Isa 19:18; 45:23; 65:16 Psalm 63:11 : S Job 5:16; Ro 3:19
    Humble yourself, for there is an enormous change coming.

  4. #1484
    Alumni Member& VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Old Ridge Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,854
    Thanks
    39,280
    Thanked: 7,005
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21474851
    Friday, August 10, 2018

    I called on your name, Lord, from the depths of the pit. Lamentations 3:55

    To visit Clifton Heritage National Park in Nassau, Bahamas, is to revisit a tragic era in history. Where the land meets the water, stone steps lead up a cliff. Slaves brought to the Bahamas by ship in the eighteenth century would ascend these steps, often leaving family behind and entering a life of inhumane treatment. At the top, there is a memorial to those slaves. Cedar trees have been carved into the shapes of women looking out to sea toward the homeland and family members they’ve lost. Each sculpture is scarred with marks of the slave captain’s whip.

    These sculptures of women mourning what they’ve lost remind me of the importance of recognizing the injustices and broken systems in the world, and lamenting them. Lamenting does not mean that we are without hope; rather, it’s a way of being honest with God. It should be a familiar posture for Christians; about forty*percent of the Psalms are psalms of lament, and in the book of Lamentations, God’s people cry out to Him after their city has been destroyed by invaders (3:55).

    Lament is a legitimate response to the reality of suffering, and it engages God in the context of pain and trouble. Ultimately, lament is hopeful: when we lament what is not right, we call ourselves and others to be active in seeking change.

    And that’s why the sculpture garden in Nassau has been named “Genesis”—the place of lament is recognized as the place of new beginnings.

    We can trust God to bring something new out of our seasons of lament. By Amy Peterson

    INSIGHT:The prophet Jeremiah had prophesied for over forty years to a disobedient, disbelieving Judah (627–580 bc). Now in five emotionally charged “funeral laments” he writes as an eyewitness, lamenting the destruction and devastation of Jerusalem, the temple, and the people as they are forcefully exiled to Babylon. He includes the reasons why God would use the Babylonians to discipline His idolatrous people (Lamentations 1:5–8; see 1 Kings 9:6–9; Jeremiah 2:11–13, 18:15–17).

    For two years the Babylonians besieged Jerusalem. Jeremiah witnessed the uncensored horrors of war (2 Kings 25:1-4; Jeremiah 52:12–27; Lamentations 2:20; 4:10). But he also wrote of hope in the midst of despair (3:21–33) and of the restoration that would come (5:19–22). Jeremiah reminded the Jewish people that the Lord, who has judged Judah rightly for her sins, is the Lord of hope (3:21, 24–25), compassion (v. 22), faithfulness (v. 23), and salvation (v. 26). Jeremiah calls the people to repent and to trust in the goodness of God (vv. 25–26; 5:21).

    “Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation,” says the apostle Paul (2 Corinthians 7:10). How has this been true in your own life?

    K. T. Sim
    Lamentations 3:49-58

    49*My eyes will flow unceasingly,
    without relief,
    50*until the Lord looks down
    from heaven and sees.
    51*What I see brings grief to my soul
    because of all the women of my city.

    52*Those who were my enemies without cause
    hunted me like a bird.
    53*They tried to end my life in a pit
    and threw stones at me;
    54*the waters closed over my head,
    and I thought I was about to perish.

    55*I called on your name, Lord,
    from the depths of the pit.
    56*You heard my plea: “Do not close your ears
    to my cry for relief.”
    57*You came near when I called you,
    and you said, “Do not fear.”

    58*You, Lord, took up my case;
    you redeemed my life.

    Cross references:Lamentations 3:49 : Jer 14:17; S La 2:18 Lamentations 3:50 : S Ps 14:2; 80:14; S Isa 63:15 Lamentations 3:52 : Ps 35:7 Lamentations 3:53 : Jer 37:16; S 38:6 Lamentations 3:54 : Ps 69:2; Jnh 2:3-5 Lamentations 3:54 : ver 18; Ps 88:5; Eze 37:11 Lamentations 3:55 : S Ps 88:6 Lamentations 3:55 : Ps 130:1; Jnh 2:2 Lamentations 3:56 : S Ps 55:1; 116:1-2 Lamentations 3:57 : S Ps 46:1 Lamentations 3:57 : Isa 41:10 Lamentations 3:58 : S Jer 51:36 Lamentations 3:58 : Ps 34:22; S Jer 50:34
    Humble yourself, for there is an enormous change coming.

  5. #1485
    Alumni Member& VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Old Ridge Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,854
    Thanks
    39,280
    Thanked: 7,005
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21474851
    Saturday, August 11, 2018

    Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters. Colossians 3:23

    Going to the grocery store isn’t something I particularly enjoy. It’s just a mundane part of life—something that has to be done.

    But there is one part of this task I’ve unexpectedly come to look forward to: checking out in Fred’s lane. Fred, you see, turns checkout into show time. He’s amazingly fast, always has a big smile, and even dances (and sometimes sings!) as he acrobatically flips (unbreakable) purchases into a plastic bag. Fred clearly enjoys a job that could be seen as one of the most tedious around. And for just a moment, his cheerful spirit brightens the lives of people in his checkout lane.

    The way Fred does his job has won my respect and admiration. His cheerful attitude, desire to serve, and attention to detail all line up well with the apostle Paul’s description of how we are to work in Colossians 3:23: “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord.”

    When we’re in relationship with Jesus, any job we have to do gives us an opportunity to reflect His presence in our lives. No task is too small . . . or too big! Tackling our responsibilities—whatever they may be—with joy, creativity, and excellence gives us an opportunity to influence those around us, no matter our job. *

    Lord, help me to tackle everything on my plate today with grace, enthusiasm, and joy, knowing that my attitude may affect others in ways I’m not even aware of.

    The best way to do satisfying work is to do it for the Lord. By Adam Holz

    INSIGHT:In his letters, the apostle Paul will often soar in the atmosphere of heavy theology, and then at other times he brings it down to everyday life with practical instructions. Today’s passage is an example of the latter. The list of instructions given in Colossians 3:18–23 and a similar list in Ephesians 5:22–6:4 are known as household codes. In these passages Paul describes how to relate to each other in our various roles—as a spouse, child, father, slave, or master. Colossians 3:23 caps this code with a well-known verse that many of us use to remind us to work for the Lord at our jobs—whether the boss is difficult or in our corner, whether our coworkers support us or are trying to undermine our efforts. Working for the Lord, however, is not restricted to our places of work. Wives, husbands, children, fathers, slaves, and masters are to fulfill their roles as to the Lord.

    What might it mean for you to work for the Lord with joy as a spouse, child, or parent?

    J.R. Hudberg
    Colossians 3:18-23

    Instructions for Christian Households

    18*Wives, submit yourselves to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord.

    19*Husbands, love your wives and do not be harsh with them.

    20*Children, obey your parents in everything, for this pleases the Lord.

    21*Fathers, do not embitter your children, or they will become discouraged.

    22*Slaves, obey your earthly masters in everything; and do it, not only when their eye is on you and to curry their favor, but with sincerity of heart and reverence for the Lord. 23*Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters,

    Footnotes:Colossians 3:21 Or Parents

    Cross references:Colossians 3:18 : 3:18-4:1pp — Eph 5:22-6:9 Colossians 3:18 : S Eph 5:22
    Humble yourself, for there is an enormous change coming.

  6. #1486
    Alumni Member& VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Old Ridge Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,854
    Thanks
    39,280
    Thanked: 7,005
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21474851
    Sunday, August 12, 2018

    Surely the Lord*was fighting for Israel! Joshua 10:14

    SOS, the Morse code signal, was created in 1905 because sailors needed a way to indicate extreme distress. The signal gained notoriety in 1910 when used by the sinking ship Steamship Kentucky, saving all forty-six*people aboard.

    While SOS may be a more recent invention, the urgent cry for help is as old as humanity. We hear it often in the Old Testament story of Joshua, who faced opposition from fellow Israelites (Joshua 9:18) and challenging terrain (3:15–17) for more than fourteen years as the Israelites slowly conquered and settled the land God had promised them. During this struggle “the Lord was with Joshua” (6:27).

    In Joshua 10, the Israelites go to the aid of the Gibeonites, allies of Israel who were being attacked by five kings. Joshua knew that he needed the Lord’s help to defeat so many powerful enemies (v. 12). God responded with a hailstorm, even stopping the sun in the middle of the sky to give Israel more time to defeat the enemy. Joshua 10:14 recounts, “Surely the Lord was fighting for Israel!”

    If you are in the midst of a challenging situation, you can send out an SOS to God. Although help will look different than the assistance Joshua received, perhaps help comes through an unexpected job, an understanding doctor, or peace in the midst of grief. Be encouraged that these are ways He is responding to your call for help and fighting for you.

    Thank You, Father, for walking with me on this difficult journey and hearing me when I cry out to You.

    As we cry out to God for help, we can trust that He will be with us. By Lisa Samra

    INSIGHT:The Gibeonites feared Israel’s God, so they tricked Joshua and the Israelites into becoming their allies (Joshua 9). So when Gibeon called Israel for help (10:6), they were ultimately calling on God.

    Do we wait for a crisis to turn to Him?

    Tim Gustafson
    Joshua 10:6-15

    6*The Gibeonites then sent word to Joshua in the camp at Gilgal: “Do not abandon your servants. Come up to us quickly and save us! Help us, because all the Amorite kings from the hill country have joined forces against us.”

    7*So Joshua marched up from Gilgal with his entire army, including all the best fighting men. 8*The Lord said to Joshua, “Do not be afraid of them; I have given them into your hand. Not one of them will be able to withstand you.”

    9*After an all-night march from Gilgal, Joshua took them by surprise. 10*The Lord threw them into confusion before Israel, so Joshua and the Israelites defeated them completely at Gibeon. Israel pursued them along the road going up to Beth Horon and cut them down all the way to Azekah and Makkedah. 11*As they fled before Israel on the road down from Beth Horon to Azekah, the Lord hurled large hailstones down on them, and more of them died from the hail than were killed by the swords of the Israelites.

    12*On the day the Lord gave the Amorites over to Israel, Joshua said to the Lord in the presence of Israel:

    “Sun, stand still over Gibeon,
    and you, moon, over the Valley of Aijalon.”
    13*So the sun stood still,
    and the moon stopped,
    till the nation avenged itself on its enemies,

    as it is written in the Book of Jashar.

    The sun stopped in the middle of the sky and delayed going down about a full day. 14*There has never been a day like it before or since, a day when the Lord listened to a human being. Surely the Lord was fighting for Israel!

    15*Then Joshua returned with all Israel to the camp at Gilgal.

    Footnotes:Joshua 10:13 Or nation triumphed over

    Cross references:Joshua 10:6 : S Dt 11:30 Joshua 10:7 : Jos 8:1 Joshua 10:8 : S Dt 3:2; S Jos 1:9 Joshua 10:8 : S Jos 2:24 Joshua 10:8 : S Dt 7:24 Joshua 10:10 : S Ex 14:24 Joshua 10:10 : S Dt 7:23 Joshua 10:10 : S Jos 9:3 Joshua 10:10 : Jos 16:3, 5; 18:13, 14; 21:22; 1Sa 13:18; 1Ki 9:17; 1Ch 6:68; 7:24; 2Ch 8:5; 25:13 Joshua 10:10 : Jos 15:35; 1Sa 17:1; 2Ch 11:9; Ne 11:30; Jer 34:7 Joshua 10:10 : ver 16, 17, 21; Jos 12:16; 15:41 Joshua 10:11 : S Ex 9:18; Ps 18:12; Isa 28:2, 17; 32:19; Eze 13:11, 13 Joshua 10:11 : Jdg 5:20 Joshua 10:12 : Am 2:9 Joshua 10:12 : Jos 19:42; 21:24; Jdg 1:35; 12:12; 1Sa 14:31; 1Ch 6:69; 8:13; 2Ch 11:10; 28:18 Joshua 10:13 : Hab 3:11 Joshua 10:13 : 2Sa 1:18 Joshua 10:13 : Isa 38:8 Joshua 10:14 : ver 42; S Ex 14:14; Ps 106:43; 136:24; Isa 63:10; Jer 21:5 Joshua 10:15 : ver 43
    Humble yourself, for there is an enormous change coming.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Old Ridge Runner For This Useful Post:

    Canadianeye (08-12-2018)

  8. #1487
    Alumni Member& VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Old Ridge Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,854
    Thanks
    39,280
    Thanked: 7,005
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21474851
    Monday, August 13, 2018

    A generous person will prosper; whoever refreshes others will be refreshed. Proverbs 11:25

    I headed into the post office in a big hurry. I had a number of things on my to-do list, but as I entered I was frustrated to find a long line backing up all the way to the door. “Hurry up and wait,” I muttered, glancing at my watch.

    My hand was still on the door when an elderly stranger approached me. “I can’t get this copier to work,” he said, pointing to the machine behind us. “It took my money and I don’t know what to do.” Immediately I knew what God wanted me to do. I stepped out of line and was able to fix the problem in ten minutes.

    The man thanked me and then left. As I turned to get back in line, it was gone. I walked straight to the service counter.

    My experience that day reminds me of Jesus’s words: “Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you” (Luke 6:38).

    My wait seemed shorter because God interrupted my hurry. By turning my eyes to others’ needs and helping me give of my time, He gave me a gift. It’s a lesson I hope to remember, next time I look at my watch.

    Heavenly Father, all of the time I have is in Your hands, a gift from You. Please show me how to use it to bring glory and honor to You.

    Sometimes our to-do list needs to wait. By James Banks

    INSIGHT:Time is a precious commodity that we can waste, spend, or invest. Moses prayed, “Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom” (Psalm 90:12). In a sense, nothing more clearly requires—or displays—a*heart of wisdom than the way we use our time. This may be why Jesus—pressed by the crowds, confronted by the needs around Him, and threatened by the religious establishment—is never described in the Gospels as being in a hurry. Instead, He saw time as having a part in the Father’s purposes. At the wedding feast in Galilee, He said to His mother, “My hour has not yet come” (John 2:4). As He drew ever closer to the cross, however, He saw that time coming to culmination. In John 12:27 He affirmed, “Now my soul is troubled, and what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour’? No, it was for this very reason I came to this hour.” Living wisely is rooted in understanding that our loving Father has a purpose behind our seconds, minutes, hours, and days.

    Bill Crowder
    Luke 6:37-38

    Judging Others

    37*“Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven. 38*Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.”

    Cross references:Luke 6:37 : 6:37-42pp — Mt 7:1-5 Luke 6:37 : S Mt 7:1 Luke 6:37 : Mt 6:14 Luke 6:38 : Ps 79:12; Isa 65:6, 7 Luke 6:38 : S Mt 7:2
    Last edited by Old Ridge Runner; 08-13-2018 at 04:37 AM.
    Humble yourself, for there is an enormous change coming.

  9. #1488
    Alumni Member& VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Old Ridge Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,854
    Thanks
    39,280
    Thanked: 7,005
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21474851
    Tuesday, August 14, 2018

    When you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you. Isaiah 43:2

    The rafting guide escorted our group to the river’s edge and directed us all to put on life jackets and grab paddles. As we climbed into the boat, he assigned us seats to balance the boat’s weight, providing stability when we encountered rapids. After highlighting the thrills the watery voyage ahead would hold for us, he detailed a series of directions we could expect to hear—and would need to follow—to effectively steer the boat through the white water. He assured us that even though there might be tense moments on the way, our journey would be both exciting and safe.

    Sometimes life feels like a white-water rafting trip, one that contains more rapids than we might like. God’s promise to Israel, through the prophet Isaiah, can guide our feelings when we fear the worst is happening: “When you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you” (Isaiah 43:2). The Israelites faced an overwhelming fear of rejection by God as they went into exile as a consequence of their sin. Yet instead, He affirms them and promises to be with them because He loves them (vv. 2, 4).

    God won’t abandon us in the rough waters. We can trust Him to guide us through the rapids—our deepest fears and most painful troubles—because He also loves us and promises to be with us. *

    Thank You, Lord, for being my guide through troubled waters. Help me to trust You even when the journey is wild and scary.

    Has the Lord guided you through a difficult time? Share your story at Facebook.com/ourdailybread.

    God steers us through difficult times. By Kirsten Holmberg

    INSIGHT:In today’s passage, God declares, “When you pass through the waters, I will be with you” (Isaiah 43:2). In the New Testament, we see this promise of God’s care displayed in two stories of literal storms. In one, Jesus is sound asleep in a boat when awakened by His disciples who are frightened by a sudden storm. He calms the storm and the disciples’ fears (Matthew 8:23-27; Mark 4:35-41; Luke 8:22-25). In a similar story, the disciples are alone in a boat when a furious squall begins. Jesus walks out to them on the water (Matthew 14:22-33; John 6:16-21) and assures them, “It is I; don’t be afraid” (v. 20). The Lord “commands even the winds and the water, and they obey Him” (Luke 8:25).

    Alyson Kieda
    Isaiah 43:1-7

    Israel’s Only Savior

    43*But now, this is what the Lord says—
    he who created you, Jacob,
    he who formed you, Israel:
    “Do not fear, for I have redeemed you;
    I have summoned you by name; you are mine.
    2*When you pass through the waters,
    I will be with you;
    and when you pass through the rivers,
    they will not sweep over you.
    When you walk through the fire,
    you will not be burned;
    the flames will not set you ablaze.
    3*For I am the Lord your God,
    the Holy One of Israel, your Savior;
    I give Egypt for your ransom,
    Cush and Seba in your stead.
    4*Since you are precious and honored in my sight,
    and because I love you,
    I will give people in exchange for you,
    nations in exchange for your life.
    5*Do not be afraid, for I am with you;
    I will bring your children from the east
    and gather you from the west.
    6*I will say to the north, ‘Give them up!’
    and to the south, ‘Do not hold them back.’
    Bring my sons from afar
    and my daughters from the ends of the earth—
    7*everyone who is called by my name,
    whom I created for my glory,
    whom I formed and made.”

    Footnotes:Isaiah 43:3 That is, the upper Nile region

    Cross references:Isaiah 43:1 : S Isa 27:11 Isaiah 43:1 : S ver 7; S Ge 2:7 Isaiah 43:1 : Ge 32:28; Isa 44:21 Isaiah 43:1 : S Ex 6:6; S Job 19:25 Isaiah 43:1 : S Isa 42:6; 45:3-4; 49:1 Isaiah 43:1 : S Dt 7:6; Mal 3:17 Isaiah 43:2 : S Isa 8:7 Isaiah 43:2 : S Ge 26:3; S Ex 14:22 Isaiah 43:2 : Isa 29:6; 30:27 Isaiah 43:2 : Ps 66:12; Da 3:25-27 Isaiah 43:3 : S Ex 20:2 Isaiah 43:3 : S Isa 41:20 Isaiah 43:3 : S Ex 14:30; S Jdg 2:18; S Ps 3:8; S Isa 25:9 Isaiah 43:3 : S Ps 68:31; Isa 19:1; Eze 29:20 Isaiah 43:3 : S Isa 20:3 Isaiah 43:3 : S Ge 10:7 Isaiah 43:3 : S Pr 21:18 Isaiah 43:4 : Ex 19:5; Isa 49:5 Isaiah 43:4 : Isa 63:9; Rev 3:9 Isaiah 43:5 : S Ge 15:1; Isa 44:2 Isaiah 43:5 : S Ge 21:22; S Ex 14:22; Jer 30:10-11 Isaiah 43:5 : Isa 41:8; 54:3; 61:9; 66:22 Isaiah 43:5 : S Isa 11:12; S 49:18 Isaiah 43:5 : S Isa 24:14; Zec 8:7; S Mt 8:11 Isaiah 43:6 : Ps 107:3 Isaiah 43:6 : Isa 60:4; Eze 16:61; 2Co 6:18 Isaiah 43:6 : S Dt 30:4; S Isa 11:12; Jer 23:8; Eze 36:24 Isaiah 43:7 : Isa 48:1; 56:5; 62:2; 63:19; 65:1; Jer 15:16; Jas 2:7 Isaiah 43:7 : S Isa 27:11 Isaiah 43:7 : S Ps 86:9 Isaiah 43:7 : ver 1, 21; Ps 100:3; S Isa 19:25
    Humble yourself, for there is an enormous change coming.

  10. #1489
    Alumni Member& VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Old Ridge Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,854
    Thanks
    39,280
    Thanked: 7,005
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21474851
    Wednesday, August 15, 2018

    Will the one who contends with the Almighty correct him? Job 40:2

    We can find nearly every argument in the book of Job about why there is pain in the world, but the arguing never seems to help Job much. His is a crisis of relationship more than a crisis of doubt. Can he trust God? Job wants one thing above all else: an appearance by the one Person who can explain his miserable fate. He wants to meet God Himself, face to face.

    Eventually Job gets his wish. God shows up in person (see Job 38:1). He times His entrance with perfect irony, just as Job’s friend Elihu is expounding on why Job has no right to expect a visit from God.

    No one—not Job, nor any of his friends—is prepared for what God has to say. Job has saved up a long list of questions, but it is God, not Job, who asks the questions. “Brace yourself like a man,” He begins; “I will question you, and you shall answer me” (v. 3). Brushing aside thirty-five chapters’ worth of debates on the problem of pain, God plunges into a majestic poem on the wonders of the natural world.

    God’s speech defines the vast difference between the God of all creation and one puny man like Job. His presence spectacularly answers Job’s biggest question: Is anybody out there? Job can only respond, “Surely I spoke of things I did not understand, things too wonderful for me to know” (42:3).

    Lord, we have so many questions about life and its unfairness. You have shown Yourself good to us. Help us to trust You for what we cannot understand.

    No calamity is beyond God’s sovereignty. By Philip Yancey

    INSIGHT:After all Job had endured, how could the Lord of heaven respond to his honest, agonizing questions with more questions?

    Job forgot the case he wanted to argue in the court of heaven (Job 23:1–10). The presence and questions of God suddenly reawakened the trust he’d expressed in those first moments of the worst days of his life (1:21; 2:10).

    We, on the other hand, have an advantage that Job lacked. In the prologue of Job’s story, we are taken behind the scenes to see how God viewed Job (1:1–2:10).

    What if our lives had such a prologue? Would it help to know that more is going on than we can see and that it’s better than we imagine? Even if we aren’t an exemplary example as Job was, can we take heart in being one of the dearly loved sinners for whom Christ died?

    Mart DeHaan
    Job 38:1-11

    The Lord Speaks

    38*Then the Lord spoke to Job out of the storm. He said:

    2*“Who is this that obscures my plans
    with words without knowledge?
    3*Brace yourself like a man;
    I will question you,
    and you shall answer me.

    4*“Where were you when I laid the earth’s foundation?
    Tell me, if you understand.
    5*Who marked off its dimensions? Surely you know!
    Who stretched a measuring line across it?
    6*On what were its footings set,
    or who laid its cornerstone—
    7*while the morning stars sang together
    and all the angels shouted for joy?

    8*“Who shut up the sea behind doors
    when it burst forth from the womb,
    9*when I made the clouds its garment
    and wrapped it in thick darkness,
    10*when I fixed limits for it
    and set its doors and bars in place,
    11*when I said, ‘This far you may come and no farther;
    here is where your proud waves halt’?

    Footnotes:Job 38:7 Hebrew the sons of God

    Cross references:Job 38:1 : S Job 11:5 Job 38:1 : S Ex 14:21; S 1Sa 2:10; Job 40:6; Isa 21:1; Eze 1:4 Job 38:2 : S 1Ki 22:5; Isa 40:13 Job 38:2 : S Job 34:35; Mk 10:38; 1Ti 1:7 Job 38:3 : Job 40:7; 42:4; Mk 11:29 Job 38:4 : S ver 5; S Ge 1:1; S 1Sa 2:8 Job 38:4 : ver 18; S Job 34:13; Pr 30:4 Job 38:5 : ver 4; Ps 102:25; Pr 8:29; Isa 40:12; 48:13; Jer 31:37 Job 38:5 : Jer 31:39; Zec 1:16; 4:9-10 Job 38:6 : Pr 8:25 Job 38:6 : S Job 26:7 Job 38:7 : S Ge 1:16 Job 38:7 : Ps 19:1-4; 148:2-3 Job 38:7 : S 1Ki 22:19 Job 38:7 : S Dt 16:15 Job 38:8 : ver 11; Ps 33:7; Pr 8:29; Jer 5:22 Job 38:8 : S Ge 1:9-10 Job 38:9 : S Ge 1:2 Job 38:10 : S Job 28:25; Ps 33:7; 104:9; Isa 40:12 Job 38:10 : Ne 3:3; Job 7:12; 26:10 Job 38:11 : S ver 8 Job 38:11 : Ps 65:7; 89:9; 104:6-9
    Humble yourself, for there is an enormous change coming.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •