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Thread: Mexican gunmen kidnap hospital patient who was later found dismembered

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Common View Post
    They dismembered him
    when will they re-instate his membership?
    sic semper tyrannis

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    [QUOTE=dinosaur;2323855]When President Trump says "they are not sending us their best", think about this ....[/QUOTE
    Or, you can think about the last paragraph of the article which was omitted from the OP.

    "According to the news report, armed men stormed two other hospitals in Juventino Rosas and Apaseo el Grande and kidnapped and killed patients who had been admitted with gunshot wounds."
    https://nypost.com/2019/12/01/watch-...d-dismembered/

    Aha! So, this "hospital patient" was also, most likely, a cartel gunman wounded in a shootout. "Hospital patient" makes a much more interesting post and a much more sympathetic victim. A headline of "Goons kidnap opposing goon from hospital" doesn't have the same sympathy hook. It also doesn't frighten the bejesus out of innocent people who aren't goons.

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    [QUOTE=patrickt;2325560]
    Quote Originally Posted by dinosaur View Post
    When President Trump says "they are not sending us their best", think about this ....[/QUOTE
    Or, you can think about the last paragraph of the article which was omitted from the OP.

    "According to the news report, armed men stormed two other hospitals — in Juventino Rosas and Apaseo el Grande — and kidnapped and killed patients who had been admitted with gunshot wounds."
    https://nypost.com/2019/12/01/watch-...d-dismembered/

    Aha! So, this "hospital patient" was also, most likely, a cartel gunman wounded in a shootout. "Hospital patient" makes a much more interesting post and a much more sympathetic victim. A headline of "Goons kidnap opposing goon from hospital" doesn't have the same sympathy hook. It also doesn't frighten the bejesus out of innocent people who aren't goons.
    You, living in Mexico, and I, having lived in Mexico, knew that this "hospital patient" was most likely hospitalized due to a previous violent encounter. But for me, that was not what makes it interesting. What makes it interesting is the brazen way the cartels conduct business, with no care or worry about interference.

    While living in Monterrey, the Dave and Busters restaurant in the local mall was closed down after a targeted hit. The assailants walked in and sat down with a family having dinner. After calmly explaining why they were there, they apologized to the wife and kids in advance, then got up, shot and killed her husband, and calmly walked out. "Nothing personal, it's just business".

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    [QUOTE=dinosaur;2325573]
    Quote Originally Posted by patrickt View Post

    You, living in Mexico, and I, having lived in Mexico, knew that this "hospital patient" was most likely hospitalized due to a previous violent encounter. But for me, that was not what makes it interesting. What makes it interesting is the brazen way the cartels conduct business, with no care or worry about interference.

    While living in Monterrey, the Dave and Busters restaurant in the local mall was closed down after a targeted hit. The assailants walked in and sat down with a family having dinner. After calmly explaining why they were there, they apologized to the wife and kids in advance, then got up, shot and killed her husband, and calmly walked out. "Nothing personal, it's just business".
    The article was written to frighten people in the U.S. who are already paranoid. Nothing personal, it's just business is quite accurate. A friend and I met two men in the mountains above Copper Canyon in Chihuahua State. I gave the each a cigarette, they were selling gold coins, in the middle of nowhere, and I wasn't buying coins. Actually, I wasn't stupid enough to tell two men with machine guns that I had enough money to buy gold coins. When we separated my friend said, "Well, they were nice."

    "They were but remember if their boss told them to kill us they wouldn't hesitate. Just business."

    I also met a man at a child's third-birthday party. We chatted a bit and parted and a friend came up and said, "If you ever need someone killed, that's who you talk to." Oh, well, that's always nice to know.

    On the other hand, I feel perfectly safe walking down the street. If you're not into drugs, not into politics, and not banging someone else's wife, you're quite safe. It also helps if you don't get falling down drunk in public.

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    [QUOTE=patrickt;2325600]
    Quote Originally Posted by dinosaur View Post
    The article was written to frighten people in the U.S. who are already paranoid. Nothing personal, it's just business is quite accurate. A friend and I met two men in the mountains above Copper Canyon in Chihuahua State. I gave the each a cigarette, they were selling gold coins, in the middle of nowhere, and I wasn't buying coins. Actually, I wasn't stupid enough to tell two men with machine guns that I had enough money to buy gold coins. When we separated my friend said, "Well, they were nice."

    "They were but remember if their boss told them to kill us they wouldn't hesitate. Just business."

    I also met a man at a child's third-birthday party. We chatted a bit and parted and a friend came up and said, "If you ever need someone killed, that's who you talk to." Oh, well, that's always nice to know.

    On the other hand, I feel perfectly safe walking down the street. If you're not into drugs, not into politics, and not banging someone else's wife, you're quite safe. It also helps if you don't get falling down drunk in public.
    I was in Monterrey between 2003-2010. I did not feel safe in my vehicle, a 1998 Dakota truck. I was stopped 84 times by the transitos. Almost always, they asked for a mordida. I always obeyed the laws and the speed limits. I was once stopped for going too slow. When asked about why I drove so slow, I told him I did not want to get stopped by the police. He laughed, and then accepted a Coke and Submarino as the mordida for his time. I did not feel safe when I stopped at a military roadblock outside of Reynosa, and the pimple faced kid with an automatic weapon demanded to see my papers, and declared that my Mexican issued FM3 visa was not sufficient, repeatedly, with escalating tone and frustration with me for saying that the FM3 was my official and only papers. I did not feel safe when the stop light bandits decided to break my antenna and wipers if I waved them off when they tried to wash my windows. I felt like a prisoner in my Colonia. I have no desire to go back to Mexico, for any reason.

    And ending on a positive note: The Mexican people, my neighbors and work associates, were friendly beyond measure and accepted me as one of them, like a family member. They invited me to their family gatherings, parties, and get togethers. The work ethic of the workers I worked with was amazing. Anyone who stands on the side of the dusty road, with crazy traffic, to be picked up by a company bus for the 1 hour commute, then put in a full day and sit on a bus for an hour home, has to be admired. Every morning at work, the Mexican managers made it a point to greet each of their employees with a hug (yes, hugs) or a handshake. While American managers took their time to prepare for meetings of the day, etc, the Mexican managers took their time making their employees the focus of their attention.

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    [QUOTE=dinosaur;2326308]
    Quote Originally Posted by patrickt View Post

    I was in Monterrey between 2003-2010. I did not feel safe in my vehicle, a 1998 Dakota truck. I was stopped 84 times by the transitos. Almost always, they asked for a mordida. I always obeyed the laws and the speed limits. I was once stopped for going too slow. When asked about why I drove so slow, I told him I did not want to get stopped by the police. He laughed, and then accepted a Coke and Submarino as the mordida for his time. I did not feel safe when I stopped at a military roadblock outside of Reynosa, and the pimple faced kid with an automatic weapon demanded to see my papers, and declared that my Mexican issued FM3 visa was not sufficient, repeatedly, with escalating tone and frustration with me for saying that the FM3 was my official and only papers. I did not feel safe when the stop light bandits decided to break my antenna and wipers if I waved them off when they tried to wash my windows. I felt like a prisoner in my Colonia. I have no desire to go back to Mexico, for any reason.

    And ending on a positive note: The Mexican people, my neighbors and work associates, were friendly beyond measure and accepted me as one of them, like a family member. They invited me to their family gatherings, parties, and get togethers. The work ethic of the workers I worked with was amazing. Anyone who stands on the side of the dusty road, with crazy traffic, to be picked up by a company bus for the 1 hour commute, then put in a full day and sit on a bus for an hour home, has to be admired. Every morning at work, the Mexican managers made it a point to greet each of their employees with a hug (yes, hugs) or a handshake. While American managers took their time to prepare for meetings of the day, etc, the Mexican managers took their time making their employees the focus of their attention.
    I've lived, and driven, in Oaxaca, Mexico, for over 20 years. I've never paid a bribe for anything. I was stopped once by a federal highway patrol officer on the coast and he clearly wanted a bribe. When I said I wasn't giving him any money he laughed and left.

    I was going to a neighboring village with a friend and we came to a checkpoint set up by the traffic police. As I got close enough they could see me they waved me through. At the time, my truck was not legal in Mexico. Coming out from the village I parked and walked up to the checkpoint and asked one of the officers why they never checked my papers. He grinned and said, "Gringos always have their papers in order." So, I got back in my illegal truck and left.

    Some years later I did get stopped at a checkpoint. I gave the traffic officer my bullshit story and he grinned and said, "None of that is true."
    "No, but it sounds good." He laughed. I said, "You've had classes from Immigration." He grinned again and nodded. We talked about why my truck hadn't gotten plates and he said, "But the law has changed. You can get plates now." If my truck had been new it would have been a problem but my truck was more than ten years old.

    He stepped back at one point and said, "This truck looks good. Do you want to sell it?"
    I laughed and said, "Driving it's a little illegal but selling it would be even more illegal."
    "Ah, but if I were buying it I could make it legal." We both laughed and he told me where to go and what I needed to get my plates. I thanked him and left. No bribe, no threats, no problem.

    Now, I'm a registered foreign national, permanent resident in Mexico, have plates on my 21-year old truck and don't have any problems. One of the reasons I enjoy living here is it reminds me of America back when it was still America. When I was ten-years old I went to Chicago with my dad. He was going on business. He and a friend were laughing about the toll road into Chicago. As we got close to Chicago I asked Dad where the toll road was. "We're on it, Pat." Maybe twenty minutes later a motorcycle cop pulled us over. Dad paid him $5, this was around 67 years ago, and we went on our way. "That was the toll, Pat. If you have out-of-state plates on your car you have to pay to get into Chicago."

    Look at what's happening in Washington DC right now and ask yourself, "Is this America?"

    I still feel safe walking down the street in Oaxaca, Huatulco, Mexico City, and other towns I visit. Some remote villages make me a bit nervous much as remote communities in the deep South made me nervous when I was young.
    Last edited by patrickt; 12-05-2019 at 06:54 AM.

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