User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Does Certified Organic Mean What We Think It Does?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Achievements:
    50000 Experience Points1 year registered
    Overall activity: 13.0%

    Fall River's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    627
    Thanks
    898
    Thanked: 343
    Rep Power
    644252
    Yes, even Rush Limbaugh advertises Boll & Branch bed sheets and proudly proclaims that they are made with "organic cotton". Which goes to show that even well known conservatives are not adverse to organically grown materials as long as they are making money on it.
    Last edited by Fall River; 09-21-2019 at 10:09 AM.

  2. #12
    Alumni Member & VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsSocialRecommendation Second ClassVeteranTagger Second ClassCreated Blog entry
    Overall activity: 73.0%

    2cent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    27,214
    Thanks
    23,512
    Thanked: 27,081
    Rep Power
    21474870
    Quote Originally Posted by Fall River View Post
    Blind faith in the safety of conventional farming always works best. Yep! You betcha. Spraying pesticides on your food is always better; anyone knows that!

    You, apparently, buy what's labeled as "organic," on blind faith, which may be, or not. What's the difference?

    As for my garden; they're pretty expensive to grow, and I prefer half of it not be eaten by potato bugs, Japanese beetles, squash bugs, and the like. We've tried those "natural" pesticides. They don't work. Therefore, Bug-B-Gone, it is. Simply wash the vegetables, and 99.9% of any pesticide residue is gone, if not all.

    I dunno. Maybe you do have a point. I'd FAR prefer to grow food with ZERO pesticides; "natural," or not. That's because even so-called "natural" pesticides, when used in doses necessary to save the crop, can be just as bad, or worse, than the chemical ones.

    There's so much to be considered, that it can't be solved in one simple equation, that's for sure.
    This message has been hidden because CNN is on your ignore list.


    When you are dead, you don't know that you are dead.
    It is difficult only for the others.
    It is the same when you are stupid.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to 2cent For This Useful Post:

    Fall River (09-21-2019)

  4. #13
    Senior Member Achievements:
    50000 Experience Points1 year registered
    Overall activity: 13.0%

    Fall River's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    627
    Thanks
    898
    Thanked: 343
    Rep Power
    644252
    Quote Originally Posted by 2cent View Post
    You, apparently, buy what's labeled as "organic," on blind faith, which may be, or not. What's the difference?
    What I had in mind when I said "blind faith" is that we never know exactly what type of pesticide or herbicide was used or how much was used. Mistakes can be made when they hire migrants to do the spraying on large farms. And I found out that they are now including antibiotics on fruit and vegetables. I didn't hear any announcement that this was being done, I just found out while doing some research online. I don't think that's good but I really need to do more research on it. Also, I read in my local newspaper that they are now using a fungicide on citrus trees in Florida that permeates the whole tree. So washing the orange or peeling the orange won't remove it. When I tried to research it to find out if it was tested for safety, I couldn't find anything about it. I called the reporter who wrote the article but he said he didn't know any more than what was in the article.


    With organics you don't always know what you're getting either, especially at "farmers markets". I knew a woman who sold organics at a local market and she told me how difficult it was to get certified. She said her land had to sit idle for about 3 years during which time many soil samples were taken. But finally she was certified. Once when I visited the market she had dark leafy greens in plastic Ziploc type bags but they weren't marked organic. She said she bought the greens in quantity from a wholesale market but then divided them up into small bags. She said she bought some things from a wholesaler because she couldn't grow everything herself. It was a few different things that put doubt in my mind as to whether they were really organic. So I stopped going to the market. Years later I decided to go again but she wasn't there. I asked another vender what happened to her and was told that she got caught selling non-organic vegetables as organic and was put out of business.

    I now put my trust in supermarkets when it comes to organics. I figure they can't afford to take the chance of ruining their reputation by selling non-organics as organics. And they usually buy from large farms that also have a reputation to uphold. As long as the prices are reasonable, like at aldi's, I figure I'm not taking that much of a risk.

    As far as growing my own, I tried it once, many years ago, and it was a disaster. Anyway, I have enough to do taking care of my yard.
    Last edited by Fall River; 09-21-2019 at 04:06 PM.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Fall River For This Useful Post:

    2cent (09-21-2019)

  6. #14
    Alumni Member & VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsSocialRecommendation Second ClassVeteranTagger Second ClassCreated Blog entry
    Overall activity: 73.0%

    2cent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    27,214
    Thanks
    23,512
    Thanked: 27,081
    Rep Power
    21474870
    Quote Originally Posted by Fall River View Post
    I now put my trust in supermarkets when it comes to organics. I figure they can't afford to take the chance of ruining their reputation by selling non-organics as organics. And they usually buy from large farms that also have a reputation to uphold. As long as the prices are reasonable, like at aldi's, I figure I'm not taking that much of a risk.
    And you think those putting their 'blind faith' in those who've been growing produce for decades isn't a wise idea?

    And, jftr, the prices you cited from the link you provided don't come close to the prices in our area. Just for starters, non-organic bananas from the Aldi's here are .29/lb. As for the rest, I couldn't begin to guess.

    As far as growing my own, I tried it once, many years ago, and it was a disaster. Anyway, I have enough to do taking care of my yard.
    True, growing your own food is not easy. Takes a lot of trial and error, patience, and hard work!
    Last edited by 2cent; 09-21-2019 at 04:14 PM.
    This message has been hidden because CNN is on your ignore list.


    When you are dead, you don't know that you are dead.
    It is difficult only for the others.
    It is the same when you are stupid.

  7. #15
    Senior Member Achievements:
    50000 Experience Points1 year registered
    Overall activity: 13.0%

    Fall River's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    627
    Thanks
    898
    Thanked: 343
    Rep Power
    644252
    Quote Originally Posted by 2cent View Post
    And you think those putting their 'blind faith' in those who've been growing produce for decades isn't a wise idea?
    That's was my opinion that I put forth jokingly. But, seriously, when we know for sure that conventional farmers are spraying all of our fruits and vegetables with (poison) chemicals, the "blind faith" is that it isn't doing any harm to one's health.


    The .57 cents I mentioned at Ald's is for organic bananas. I was comparing them to Publix's regular bananas that they sell at a higher price. My aldi's usually sells regular non-organic bananas for about .34 cents. It can fluctuate up or down a few cents. But the organic bananas have been .57 cents for as long as I can remember.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •