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Thread: The Fate of Women Who Lived with Boko Haram

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    The Fate of Women Who Lived with Boko Haram

    The Islamic terrorist group Boko Haram raped and ravished these women to their heart's content.

    Video in link:
    https://www.crisisgroup.org/africa/w...ved-boko-haram


    The Nigerian government has been waging a war. The government mainly controls the South and Boko Haram effectively controls vast swaths in the Northern of the country. Any surprise it's the North part of the country that is dry and deserty with lots of sand?

    These poor women. Many of those Islamo-fighters think they can treat these women however they want because they're Christians.

    Any surprise though these narrators who put together that documentary video almost seem to sympathizing with Boko Haram?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kazenatsu View Post
    The Islamic terrorist group Boko Haram raped and ravished these women to their heart's content.

    Video in link:
    https://www.crisisgroup.org/africa/w...ved-boko-haram


    The Nigerian government has been waging a war. The government mainly controls the South and Boko Haram effectively controls vast swaths in the Northern of the country. Any surprise it's the North part of the country that is dry and deserty with lots of sand?

    These poor women. Many of those Islamo-fighters think they can treat these women however they want because they're Christians.

    Any surprise though these narrators who put together that documentary video almost seem to sympathizing with Boko Haram?
    Well, Boko Haram are "rapists of color".

    The MSM is so trained and obligatory to the various PC groups, all the need to hear is "of color", or "trans american" or "moose-lum" (in Ilhan Omar speak) and they immediatly go to a defensive posture with said group and positive, reinforcing propaganda for them.

    It's an immediate gut reaction more than a "think through" of what happened: a woman got raped...agggghhhh.......#MeToo.........Christian woman.......could she may have provoked it in some way?........Boko Haram did it............muslims of color........marginalized, probably by Christians......Christian woman....probably deserved it for her marginalizing......Boko Haram.........rapists of color.........the Quran DOES command them to do that after all, Islam MUST be respected.....nothing to see here...move along, move along.
    "Hello all".......I would have said "good evening ladies and gents", but you all know what you are.......Moe Howard
    (what I'm sure was an inside joke to all the Hollyweird actors in the scene at the time, as Hollywood was Weinstein before Weinsten ever was)

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    I am so sorry for these poor women. They have truly suffered, and I'm sure many of them would have preferred suicide. They still may.
    Unwavering support of my President, Donald J Trump

    ~Shower the people you love with love~

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    Let me go over all the points, one by one, where these UN-types who made that video sympathesize with the terrorist mussies:

    0:20
    "For 10 years, clashes between the rebel group, Boko Haram, have killed several thousand people, and displaced more than 2 million in Nigeria alone"
    First they almost make it sound like it's just a war between two factions, in a rather non-judgemental way, almost as if Boko Haram was not really any less legitimate than the Nigerian government. Laying the blame on the conflict, rather than Boko Haram.

    0:37
    "The Nigerian army's advance prompted many women affiliated with Boko Haram to flee the group. Others were captured or rescued by the soldiers. They are slowly being reintegrated back into community life, but they suffer ostracism, higher risks of sexual abuse and economic hardship."
    Oh those poor women, we are told. They're trying to make us feel sympathetic to those women who were part of Boko Haram.
    Boko Haram was the group that raped women on a massive scale, but now these narrators seem to be trying to turn the tables and see these women former members of Boko Haram reintroduced into Nigerian society are somehow the ones more likely to suffer rape?
    Hardly makes much sense if you stop to think about it.

    1:00
    "The lack of protection from these women, along with the state's failure to address legitimate grievances sufficiently, are sowing the seeds of future conflict in this already devastated region"
    Oh, so this terrorist group has legitimate grievances, we are told. They're putting blame on the Nigerian government for Boko Haram's attacks. And if there are future attacks from Boko Haram, it's the fault of the Nigerian government's war they are waging against the terrorist group. Next they call it an 'already devastated region', more pity party for these muslims. That evil Nigerian government, just making things worse for the muslims!
    Unbelievable.

    2:46
    "But at the same time, ending the conflict and the violence requires ensuring that women, formerly associated with the group, who come out, want to stay out."
    So she lays the blame on 'conflict and violence' itself rather than the terrorist group that's committing all these atrocities. And then she implies the Nigerian government has some sort of obligation to help women if they don't want them to support the terrorist group.

    2:58
    "Women's experiences leaving the group will be watched closely by the men, 'cause of course ultimately it's the men who form the fighting core of the group. And it is their disarmament, they're belief in an exit pathway that's safe and viable that will bring an end to the conflict."
    So now she talks about disarmament and peace. If only everyone could just lay down their arms and stop fighting! Sounds very hyper-liberal.

    3:20
    "The narrative around women and Boko Haram is very much dominated by the abduction of the Chibok school girls ... It's certainly a narrative that the government itself upholds, that women primarily associate with Boko Haram through victimhood, that women are abducted, they are coerced, that the story of women in Boko Haram is one of kidnapped victims. That's certainly a strand of women's experiences, and we know that to be true, but it's certainly not the only experience"
    More 'female empowerment' talk. Women are not victims, they have power, etc.
    She completely brushes away and sidelines all the women who were abused, which is about half of them.
    And she is talking about women who voluntarily join a militant Islamic terrorist group of their own accord. Trying to give a flair of female empowerment to that!

    6:29
    "I think there's a tendency in gender-sensitive research about the Northeast and Boko Haram to portray women as rebelling against patriarchy, by joining this group. Um, I think that misses out the intensity of inequality and state neglect and corruption. You walk through the streets of Maiduguri, you see these mansions, with flowering palm trees and manicured lawns..."
    I don't know what type of hyper-Liberal world she lives in. First she comes out and reveals there's a field of thought among her colleagues that sees women joining the terrorist group Boko Haram as some sort of female empowerment. How does that even make sense? We know how women are treated in these radical Islamic groups.
    But then she goes and says that's not really the main point (not even denying that perspective) and puts the blame on inequality.
    Yes, it's because of rampant inequality, she tells us, that these women feel like they have to join a terrorist group. Economic unfairness all around them, lots of corruption in government, so why not join Boko Haram?

    I think this really demonstrates the intellectual alliance that exists between radical progressive feminism and defending radical Islam.
    Last edited by kazenatsu; 09-18-2019 at 11:19 AM.

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    [QUOTE=kazenatsu;2255963]Let me go over all the points, one by one, where these UN-types who made that video sympathesize with the terrorist mussies:

    0:20
    "For 10 years, clashes between the rebel group, Boko Haram, have killed several thousand people, and displaced more than 2 million in Nigeria alone"
    First they almost make it sound like it's just a war between two factions, in a rather non-judgemental way, almost as if Boko Haram was not really any less legitimate than the Nigerian government. Laying the blame on the conflict, rather than Boko Haram.

    0:37
    "The Nigerian army's advance prompted many women affiliated with Boko Haram to flee the group. Others were captured or rescued by the soldiers. They are slowly being reintegrated back into community life, but they suffer ostracism, higher risks of sexual abuse and economic hardship."
    Oh those poor women, we are told. They're trying to make us feel sympathetic to those women who were part of Boko Haram.
    Boko Haram was the group that raped women on a massive scale, but now these narrators seem to be trying to turn the tables and see these women former members of Boko Haram reintroduced into Nigerian society are somehow the ones more likely to suffer rape?
    Hardly makes much sense if you stop to think about it.

    1:00
    "The lack of protection from these women, along with the state's failure to address legitimate grievances sufficiently, are sowing the seeds of future conflict in this already devastated region"
    Oh, so this terrorist group has legitimate grievances, we are told. They're putting blame on the Nigerian government for Boko Haram's attacks. And if there are future attacks from Boko Haram, it's the fault of the Nigerian government's war they are waging against the terrorist group. Next they call it an 'already devastated region', more pity party for these muslims. That evil Nigerian government, just making things worse for the muslims!
    Unbelievable.

    2:46
    "But at the same time, ending the conflict and the violence requires ensuring that women, formerly associated with the group, who come out, want to stay out."
    So she lays the blame on 'conflict and violence' itself rather than the terrorist group that's committing all these atrocities. And then she implies the Nigerian government has some sort of obligation to help women if they don't want them to support the terrorist group.

    2:58
    "Women's experiences leaving the group will be watched closely by the men, 'cause of course ultimately it's the men who form the fighting core of the group. And it is their disarmament, they're belief in an exit pathway that's safe and viable that will bring an end to the conflict."
    So now she talks about disarmament and peace. If only everyone could just lay down their arms and stop fighting! Sounds very hyper-liberal.

    3:20
    "The narrative around women and Boko Haram is very much dominated by the abduction of the Chibok school girls ... It's certainly a narrative that the government itself upholds, that women primarily associate with Boko Haram through victimhood, that women are abducted, they are coerced, that the story of women in Boko Haram is one of kidnapped victims. That's certainly a strand of women's experiences, and we know that to be true, but it's certainly not the only experience"
    More 'female empowerment' talk. Women are not victims, they have power, etc.
    She completely brushes away and sidelines all the women who were abused, which is about half of them.
    And she is talking about women who voluntarily join a militant Islamic terrorist group of their own accord. Trying to give a flair of female empowerment to that!

    6:29
    "I think there's a tendency in gender-sensitive research about the Northeast and Boko Haram to portray women as rebelling against patriarchy, by joining this group. Um, I think that misses out the intensity of inequality and state neglect and corruption. You walk through the streets of Maiduguri, you see these mansions, with flowering palm trees and manicured lawns..."
    I don't know what type of hyper-Liberal world she lives in. First she comes out and reveals there's a field of thought among her colleagues that sees women joining the terrorist group Boko Haram as some sort of female empowerment. How does that even make sense? We know how women are treated in these radical Islamic groups.
    But then she goes and says that's not really the main point (not even denying that perspective) and puts the blame on inequality.
    Yes, it's because of rampant inequality, she tells us, that these women feel like they have to join a terrorist group. Economic unfairness all around them, lots of corruption in government, so why not join Boko Haram?

    I think this really demonstrates the intellectual alliance that exists between radical progressive feminism and defending radical Islam.[/QUOTE]

    well said....the mental gymnastics this female goes through to justify her nonsense is appalling...
    "The nose, knows"

    @Auntifa,,,when the shooting starts, don't run, you'll only die tired...

    #walkaway

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