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Thread: Where us fatties are

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retiredat50 View Post
    Words do mean things, and facts are facts.

    *Fact, BMI is inaccurate, period, you have admitted it yourself.
    It's a fact when taken by itself. But what about the facts you left out? Like the fact that adjustments can be made to compensate for athletes and body builders. Also left out is the fact that the survey was conducted by telephone. The percentages were the result of "self-reported obesity."

    *Fact, the biggest determining factor of weight loss and weight gain are calories in and calories burned.
    Fact: I never said it wasn't a factor. I'm saying that the overwhelming majority of diets don't work long-term because the "calories in and calories burned" method doesn't take into account the root cause.
    Recent studies indicate that the obese microbiome is more efficient at harvesting energy from food. (A calorie is a unit of energy.) Conversely, lean people, because of a different makeup of micro flora in their intestines, harvest less energy from the food they eat.

    *Fact, we have no idea how many people are or are not overweight in America because they are using an inaccurate measuring system (BMI). So saying we are at record levels just does not work.
    Fact, as I said before, the statistics were based on telephone interviews and people who self-reported being obese.

    Saying that calories in, calories out is wrong because that has been the standard for many years yet we have more fat people now is... I mean really, seriously, that is your argument? Maybe there are more fat people now because our lifestyles have changed drastically from say 40 years ago.
    Lifestyles have changed but so has the effort to lose weight. At any given time, roughly 50% of American adults are trying to lose or maintain their weight. Were's the pay-off for all of that effort?

    I don't know your age, I am 54 and when I was a kid we ate tons of fast food, junk food and very few of us were fat. Because we were always active. Riding our bikes, skateboarding, swimming, playing stickball and so on. Now you go into a neighborhood and all the kids are inside. Playing video games, texting each other and watching TV or Youtube. The adults are also a lot more sedentary than 40 years ago.
    I'm 78, and when I was kid, there were NO fast food restaurants to speak of and no supermarkets loaded with fast food. I believe the first McDonald's I ever saw was when I was about 18. They provided outside service only, they advertised a complete meal for under a dollar. No drive up window, you would walk up to a window and place your order, then take the food to your car and eat in the car. I took 3 of my friends from school and, as young as we were, we knew it wasn't a healthy meal. We all thought the same thing, "hey, they call this a meal?" Essentially, it was a burger, fries and a coke.

    I haven't noticed that kids are inside all the time. Where I live I sometimes see lots of kids walking after school. They either walk to the library or walk to a nearby shopping plaza. When they go to the library you would think they would head for the computers, but they don't. They mostly stand around and talk to each other. It's like a social festival - they actually interact with each other. That's healthy. Of course many of them look as though they could stand to lose some weight, perhaps 30% of them.

    But too much dependence on exercise is not a good plan. Over the years I have noticed many overweight men who were exercising like crazy all the time but never seemed to lose any weight. They always looked the same despite the huge effort they put in.
    Last edited by Fall River; 09-18-2019 at 11:50 AM.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickt View Post
    A. I'm fat but I can sit in one seat on an airplane, I walk miles every day getting things done, and I don't care.

    B. I laugh at people fatter than me who insist I'm not fat because that might mean they're fat.

    C. I don't harass fat people but I don't accept their bullshit either. A friend, who was called Fat Paul to distinguish him from the Paul from Seattle said, "I'm not fat, Pat."
    "Sure you are."
    "I mean I'm not really fat."
    "Paul, you are really fat. That's why you're had a quadruple bypass surgery, have high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes."
    He sat there a moment and said, "But, when I look in a mirror I don't see a fat man."

    He probably didn't. An anorexic woman I worked with looked in the mirror and saw fat.

    A woman I know said, "I like Mexican men because they don't mind if a woman's a little chubby."
    "Who do you know who's a little chubby?"
    "Me."
    "Suzanne, you passed a little chubby when you were ten-years old."

    I'm thinking about writing a book on things not to say to women. I gave my son the lecture when he was getting married. He actually thought women preferred honesty.
    What you have said is very true. I always thought that an obese person would know they are obese. But they don't always know. Many years ago I had an obese neighbor who came over to my house to tell me something.

    Of all things, I just happened to be reading a health book and it had a BMI chart that I was looking at. So she asked me what I was doing and I told her (big mistake). She then wanted to know what her BMI was. So I asked to know her height and weight. Her BMI was way over 30 - around 36. So then she wanted to know what that meant and I had to tell her. When I told her she was obese, she felt very insulted and started saying that there was no such thing as "obese". She said it was a word that didn't exist years ago and they just made it up in recent years. She said it's just normal to gain weight as you get older - she called it "growing into her adult body". So what had happened to her was quite innocent, she simply grew into her adult body.

    She got quite angry at one point, but at the end she said she wasn't angry at me; she was just angry at those who made up the word "obese".
    Last edited by Fall River; 09-19-2019 at 10:12 AM.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crusader View Post
    Ive been on a pretty big work out and diet kick lately, even becoming a little obsessive about it. Iíve been into weight lifting for awhile and let my diet go and concentrated on putting on mass. Well I put on to much unwanted mass, so Iíve cut my calorie intake and really increased my cardio(9 cardio workouts a week). Iím doing a low carb diet, cut out bread, pasta, potatoes and most sugar. Even with that Iíve only dropped 10 pounds in a month, but I also lift fairly heavy 3 times a week muscle is heavier then fat.
    Why is it that losing weight always seems to be about speed? Perhaps it's because many people get on a special restrictive diet that they find difficult, and the sooner they lose weight the sooner they can get off the diet. But it's been said many times in the past that dieting doesn't work for that very reason. There's that slippery slope where people slowly slide back into their old eating habits. Then they gain back the weight they lost and more. And, eventually, another diet will follow. That's called "yo-yo" dieting.

    The main point I would like to make is that rapid weight loss or yo-yo dieting can be toxic. I have read about this many times in books written by medical doctors. And just now I found a great article online that tells the whole story, based on a study that was published in the International Journal of Obesity.

    Here's the link: https://cathe.com/can-rapid-weight-loss-be-toxic/ "Can Rapid Weight Loss Be Toxic?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fall River View Post
    Why is it that losing weight always seems to be about speed? Perhaps it's because many people get on a special restrictive diet that they find difficult, and the sooner they lose weight the sooner they can get off the diet. But it's been said many times in the past that dieting doesn't work for that very reason. There's that slippery slope where people slowly slide back into their old eating habits. Then they gain back the weight they lost and more. And, eventually, another diet will follow. That's called "yo-yo" dieting.

    The main point I would like to make is that rapid weight loss or yo-yo dieting can be toxic. I have read about this many times in books written by medical doctors. And just now I found a great article online that tells the whole story, based on a study that was published in the International Journal of Obesity.

    Here's the link: https://cathe.com/can-rapid-weight-loss-be-toxic/ "Can Rapid Weight Loss Be Toxic?"
    Copy that my situation is a little more complicated, I don’t really care about losing weight. I’d be just fine putting on more weight as long as it was muscle and not fat.

    My situation is always a balancing act, I need the food to put on muscle but have to be careful not to over do it. When I cut back on food I have to be careful that I don’t go too far and lose muscle as well as fat.

    But in reality you can’t have both, if you bulk up your gonna get some fat. When you lose weight your gonna lose muscle as well as fat. The trick is to try to keep both at a minimum, it’s not easy and no one diet or routine works the same for everybody.

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