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  1. #1
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    John Locke on religious....

    ....tolerance.

    "A revival of Lockean liberalism would do much to tame the hatreds now afflicting the soul of the West.In the summer of 1704, English philosopher John Locke began writing a response to a critic of his controversial treatise on religious freedom, A Letter Concerning Toleration (1689). It was, in fact, the third letter from Locke addressed to Jonas Proast, a chaplain at Oxford University, who insisted that government coercion in religious matters was necessary to preserve social order. Locke fired back: “Men in all religions have equally strong persuasion, and every one must judge for himself,” he wrote. “Nor can any one judge for another, and you last of all for the magistrate.”
    https://www.nationalreview.com/2019/...ican-founding/

    "Yet — contrary to Locke’s modern interpreters — it was consistent with his views about Catholics and other religious minorities throughout most of his political career. As an assistant to Sir Walter Vane, for example, Locke’s first diplomatic mission in 1665 took him to the Duchy of Cleves, in modern-day Germany. In one of his reports, Locke admits that
    the Catholic religion is a different thing from what we believe in England. I have other thoughts of it than when I was in a place that is filled with prejudices, and things known only by hearsay. I have not met with so many good-natured people or so civil, as the Catholic priests, and I have received many courtesies from them, which I shall always gratefully acknowledge.
    Locke also records his surprise at the social harmony between Calvinists, Lutherans, and Catholics, who each practiced their faith in relative freedom: “The distance in their churches gets not into their houses. . . . I cannot observe any quarrels or animosities amongst them upon the account of religion.” It was his first encounter with religious pluralism, and it left a deep and lasting impression."

    In my life I've known Muslims, Jews, and Christians who I respected and admired while believing none of the superstition and magic. I've also known Muslims, Jews, and Christians I had no cause to respect or admire. I arrest some of each group for good cause. A friend of mine who has died had an incredible hatred of Catholics. He was a Southern Baptists under orders from his wife. I asked a few times why he hated Catholics but he never responded. Of course, it wasn't just Catholics he hated.

    So, I hope the article is interesting.



    I found the article interesting and very relevant to modern times.

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    Thomas Helwys - Wikipedia

    Thomas Helwys (c. 1575 – c. 1616), an Englishman, was one of the joint founders, with John Smyth, of the General Baptist denomination.


    "In the early seventeenth century, Helwys was principal formulator of that distinctively Baptist request: that the church and the state be kept separate in matters of law, so that individuals might have a freedom of religious conscience. Thomas Helwys was an advocate of religious liberty at a time when to hold to such views could be dangerous. He died in prison as a consequence of the religious persecution of Protestant dissenters under King James I."
    Last edited by Oberon; 09-13-2019 at 12:21 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickt View Post
    ....tolerance.

    "A revival of Lockean liberalism would do much to tame the hatreds now afflicting the soul of the West.In the summer of 1704, English philosopher John Locke began writing a response to a critic of his controversial treatise on religious freedom, A Letter Concerning Toleration (1689). It was, in fact, the third letter from Locke addressed to Jonas Proast, a chaplain at Oxford University, who insisted that government coercion in religious matters was necessary to preserve social order. Locke fired back: “Men in all religions have equally strong persuasion, and every one must judge for himself,” he wrote. “Nor can any one judge for another, and you last of all for the magistrate.”
    https://www.nationalreview.com/2019/...ican-founding/

    "Yet — contrary to Locke’s modern interpreters — it was consistent with his views about Catholics and other religious minorities throughout most of his political career. As an assistant to Sir Walter Vane, for example, Locke’s first diplomatic mission in 1665 took him to the Duchy of Cleves, in modern-day Germany. In one of his reports, Locke admits that
    the Catholic religion is a different thing from what we believe in England. I have other thoughts of it than when I was in a place that is filled with prejudices, and things known only by hearsay. I have not met with so many good-natured people or so civil, as the Catholic priests, and I have received many courtesies from them, which I shall always gratefully acknowledge.
    Locke also records his surprise at the social harmony between Calvinists, Lutherans, and Catholics, who each practiced their faith in relative freedom: “The distance in their churches gets not into their houses. . . . I cannot observe any quarrels or animosities amongst them upon the account of religion.” It was his first encounter with religious pluralism, and it left a deep and lasting impression."

    In my life I've known Muslims, Jews, and Christians who I respected and admired while believing none of the superstition and magic. I've also known Muslims, Jews, and Christians I had no cause to respect or admire. I arrest some of each group for good cause. A friend of mine who has died had an incredible hatred of Catholics. He was a Southern Baptists under orders from his wife. I asked a few times why he hated Catholics but he never responded. Of course, it wasn't just Catholics he hated.

    So, I hope the article is interesting.



    I found the article interesting and very relevant to modern times.
    No quarrels, but no marriages either.

    The animosities remain unspoken.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nonsqtr View Post
    No quarrels, but no marriages either.

    The animosities remain unspoken.
    Of course, the animosities remain but scarcely unspoken. Macys vs. Gimbels. Google vs. Apple. Amazon vs. Walmart. Competing enterprises do compete and should but the government should not ban one and make the other a monopoly. Religions are big businesses and they do compete and they have fanatically loyal customer bases.

    As for not intermarrying, I'm not a big fan of marriage.

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