User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: MARS Inc. and Cobalt Kinetics Submit NEW Carbine, LMG and 6.8mm Cartridge for US Army

  1. #1
    Alumni Member & VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsTagger Second ClassSocialVeteran
    Overall activity: 81.0%

    Big Dummy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    19,560
    Thanks
    40,736
    Thanked: 25,621
    Rep Power
    21474859

    MARS Inc. and Cobalt Kinetics Submit NEW Carbine, LMG and 6.8mm Cartridge for US Army

    MARS Inc. and Cobalt Kinetics Submit NEW Carbine, LMG and 6.8mm Cartridge for US Army NGSW Program

    Posted by Hrachya H



    Cobalt Kinetics has published a news release announcing that in cooperation with MARS Inc. they have submitted a new carbine (NGSW-R), light machine gun (NGSW-AR) and 6.8mm cartridge to US Army’s NGSW (Next Generation Squad Weapons) program. The program is targeted to replacing the M4/M16 family of rifles and carbines as well as the M249 SAW LMG by new weapons and ammunition that will provide enhanced performance.
    MARS Inc. / Cobalt Kinetics NGSW-R carbine. Barrel length – 13″.

    Apparently, these new weapons are based on the MARS rifle design which we had a chance to take a look at and shoot at SHOT Show 2019. It is a rather unusual rifle that utilizes a combination of long barrel recoiling and gas operated actions which MARS Inc. calls “gas-assist recoil operating system“. However, judging by the description in the press release, the new rifles are only long barrel recoil operated. The rifle that they brought to the show was chambered in .308 Win but the felt recoil was similar to .223 Remingtonand it also felt differently – it was rather a push than a kick.

    MARS Inc. / Cobalt Kinetics NGSW-AR light machine gun. Barrel length – 18″

    The two companies have also developed a short magnum 6.8mm (.277 caliber) cartridge that launches 140gr projectiles at a muzzle velocity of 3,200 fps. Both the carbine and LMG have enlarged magazine wells to accommodate the large box magazines. These guns are fed from 20-round box magazines or 70-round drums.
    L-R: 5.56x45mm NATO, 7.62x51mm NATO, the new 6.8mm short magnum cartridge. The new cartridge looks and performs similar to .270 WSM.


    Below you can find more images of these weapons followed by the full press release text.
    MARS INC. / COBALT KINETICS NGSW-R CARBINE











    MARS INC. / COBALT KINETICS NGSW-AR LIGHT MACHINE GUN










    Washington Utah, August 28, 2019

    The Army has been soliciting design and manufacturing firms for a next-generation weapon platform. This NGSW program is expected to produce a replacement for the M16 battle-rifle and SAW machine gun. Along with the request for this all-new weapon, this project demands a new cartridge to be developed alongside and incorporated into these new battle rifles.

    The initial call-out for the program seeks to dramatically increase the terminal power and effective distance of the 5.56 NATO and even the 7.62 NATO. The performance of the new cartridge will rival the exterior and terminal ballistics of some current commercial magnum hunting cartridges. It seems a worthwhile endeavor to outfit each soldier with an 8lb rifle that can hit a 1 MOA hardened target, and penetrate that target up to and exceeding 1000 yards. If that’s not enough to impress, this new weapon will fulfill these requirements without compromising the control and handling characteristics currently accepted in the M16 and SAW light machine gun.

    MARS, INC of Montana teamed up with Cobalt Kinetics of Utah early in 2019 to realize this seemingly-impossible task. The brain-trust of MARS approach the modern semi-autorifle from a fresh perspective while Cobalt Kinetics’ skill and expertise at precision manufacturing made the idea a reality. The resulting weapon presents as an extra-large framed AR-patterned rifle- with a huge magazine well to accommodate the new cartridge. Inside the handguard one can identify a large recoil spring wrapped around the barrel- an essential part of any long-recoil operating system. For those unfamiliar with this type of mechanism, it’s not unlike your grandfather’s Browning Auto-5 shotgun. But make no mistake, this is not your grandfather’s battle rifle. The bolt and barrel, while locked, are allowed to travel freely within the action under the recoil impulse generated by the 6.8mm short magnum cartridge (the guns fire 140gr .270 caliber bullets at 3200FPS). This operating system causes a great deal of recoil energy to be spent and dissipated before the total recoiling mass delivers a blow to the shooter’s shoulder. Similar systems have been employed over the past few decades in some soviet rifle and machine-gun designs. This operation has been labeled as “shifted pulse recoil”. The recoil impulse is effectively distributed over time, while its speed is reduced by a spring and buffer system before the stroke is complete. The result is a slower and softer impulse to the shooter- more to the point- This rifle is as controllable and comfortable to shoot as the old low-impulse 5.56 platform, while doubling the effective distance and energy.

    Besides reduced recoil, there are many other advantages of long-recoil semi-autooperation. No gas escapes the barrel into the action- this rifle, with full-auto capability, runs as clean as any bolt action. When operating with a suppressor, the long-recoil system actually runs more reliably and with less recoil that unsuppressed. Of course, the added mass slows down the barrel/bolt assembly but that extra mass and resultant momentum to the recoiling assembly help the system power through dirt and particulate that can foul other semi-auto mechanisms. And the addition of suppressor does not contribute to increases fouling in the action as the system operates so slowly (relative to DI or piston) the propellant gasses and powder-charge fallout have fully evacuated by the time the bolt unlocks and opens to eject and reload the weapon.

    MARS and Cobalt have developed 2 versions of the “MARS” rifle. A 13” barreled lightweight carbine and an 18” barreled light machine gun have been supplied to the ARMY for testing and evaluation. Both are fed from proprietary 20 round box or 70 round drum magazines. Both are capable of semi and full-auto fire. The MARS rifles have been designed to incorporate the newest “smart” battlefield tech to keep the soldier connected and adaptable as battlefield tactics become more advanced. These technologies include a central power source to supply all peripheral accessories while tracking and displaying their performance and status. Light, illumination, direction of fire, total rounds fired between service intervals, ammunition supply in the magazine, and operating temperature can be tracked by a central command module on the gun. This information can be communicated to remote command to support the soldier of tomorrow.

    Michael Merino, President and CEO of MARS Inc. adds: “I can’t think of a better collaboration in this industry. Our MARS rifle design, coupled with the innovative approach to rifle manufacturing of the Cobalt Kinetics team, has been incredible. We believe that we have a rifle design that meets the requirements of the Army’s ambitious NGSW program. We are excited to be part of evolution of military effectiveness. We also plan to release a commercially available version of this rifle, in the first few months of 2020.”

    More information on the MARS rifle can be found at https://www.marsrifle.com/
    I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them. — George Mason, during Virginia’s Convention to Ratify the Constitution (1788)

  2. #2
    V.I.P. V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsTagger First ClassRecommendation Second ClassVeteran
    Overall activity: 12.0%

    MedicineBow's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    The Rockies
    Posts
    3,244
    Thanks
    3,862
    Thanked: 4,734
    Rep Power
    17649371
    Looks interesting and I like the choice of caliber. I've been a huge .270 fan for decades and have killed many animals using that caliber. It is deadly at many hundred yards. Will be interesting to see how this pans out.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to MedicineBow For This Useful Post:

    Big Dummy (08-28-2019)

  4. #3
    Alumni Member & VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsTagger Second ClassSocialVeteran
    Overall activity: 81.0%

    Big Dummy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    19,560
    Thanks
    40,736
    Thanked: 25,621
    Rep Power
    21474859
    Quote Originally Posted by MedicineBow View Post
    Looks interesting and I like the choice of caliber. I've been a huge .270 fan for decades and have killed many animals using that caliber. It is deadly at many hundred yards. Will be interesting to see how this pans out.
    One spec this rifle did not meet was light weight ammunition. Plastic case, cased telescoped or something else that would make carrying more rounds at the same weight as todays load out weight.
    Last edited by Big Dummy; 08-28-2019 at 09:44 PM.
    I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them. — George Mason, during Virginia’s Convention to Ratify the Constitution (1788)

  5. #4
    V.I.P. V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsTagger First ClassRecommendation Second ClassVeteran
    Overall activity: 12.0%

    MedicineBow's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    The Rockies
    Posts
    3,244
    Thanks
    3,862
    Thanked: 4,734
    Rep Power
    17649371
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Dummy View Post
    One spec this rifle did not meet was light weight ammunition. Plastic case, cased telescoped or something else that would make carrying more rounds at the same weight as todays load out weight.
    It might be hard to do. Bigger ammo, more weight.

    Jack O'Connor made me a huge. 270 fan. Sure miss his writings, Elmer Keith also.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to MedicineBow For This Useful Post:

    Big Dummy (08-28-2019)

  7. #5
    Alumni Member & VIP V.I.P Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsTagger Second ClassSocialVeteran
    Overall activity: 81.0%

    Big Dummy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    19,560
    Thanks
    40,736
    Thanked: 25,621
    Rep Power
    21474859
    Quote Originally Posted by MedicineBow View Post
    It might be hard to do. Bigger ammo, more weight.

    Jack O'Connor made me a huge. 270 fan. Sure miss his writings, Elmer Keith also.

    It looks like they are taking an off-the-shelf ammunition and making a low recoil AR likeness semi-auto/full-auto for it.




    Head to Head: .270 Winchester vs. .270 WSM

    by Philip Massaro - Friday, October 12, 2018









    The release of the .270 Winchester in 1925 in the Winchester Model 54 rifle saw the beginning of the American love affair with velocity, as well as the laying of a solid foundation for the American bolt-action sporting rifle. At the time, the lever gun held court in the hunting fields, though through the writings of Mr. O’Connor, change was on the wind.
    Jack O’Connor’s championing of the .270 Winchester may have been the best ringing endorsement of any cartridge if the 20th century; it became the favorite of millions of deer hunters, as well as those in pursuit of the wild sheep that Jack loved so much. It wasn’t all marketing hype though; the .270 Winchester is a flat-shooting cartridge, perfect for deer and similar-sized game. With the bullets available in the 1920s and 30s, it showed its limits on elk and the larger cervids—Elmer Keith certainly took exception to using the fast/light combination on game of this caliber—but the .270 was an undeniable deer killer.



    With a range of bullet weights between 90 and 150 grains, it could easily handle woodchucks and coyotes, as well as black bear. The 130- and 150-grain slugs were the most popular for big game, and as the .270 was based on the .30-03 cartridge—the predecessor of the .30-06 Springfield—there was plenty of case capacity. Maintaining the same 17˚-30′ shoulder of its parent, it drives the 130-grain bullets to right around 3100 fps, and the 150-grainers to nearly 3000 fps (both figures depending on barrel length) giving a trajectory that became ever-more appreciated as telescopic sights came into vogue. Many hunters preferred to carry “Jack’s two-seventy” afield each season, and nearly every rifle maker offered the cartridge in their lineup, whether it was a bolt-action, semi-automatic or pump.



    The bore diameter of the .270 Winchester—.277″—is not exactly a very popular one; there are very few other cartridges using this bore diameter, certainly fewer than the 6.5mm, 7mm and .30s that surround it. Perhaps it’s because the .270 Winchester does what it does so well.



    For over 75 years the .270 Winchester reigned supreme within that bore diameter, having only the .270 Weatherby Magnum as its competition. It was in 2003, as Winchester was unveiling the follow-up cartridges to their .300 Winchester Short Magnum that the second .270 came to bear the Winchester moniker. The .270 Winchester Short Magnum is part of that family of cartridges based on the .404 Jeffery, which include the Remington Ultra Magnum and Short Action Ultra Magnums; it is designed to exceed the velocities of the .270 Winchester, but in a short action rifle. With a 35˚ shoulder, and a 2.100″ case—the same as the .308 Winchester—the .270 WSM performs as advertised, giving a 200-250 fps advantage over its older sibling. Pushing a 150-grain bullet to 3250 fps, the .270 WSM certainly earns the Magnum title, but at what cost? Like the .270 Weatherby Magnum—released 60 years prior to the .270 WSM—it betters the velocity of the .270 Winchester, but I’m not certain that the increased velocity is necessarily required.


    In my opinion, one of the drawbacks of all three of the .270s is their twist rate. Typically, all three are provided with a 1:10″ twist rate, which limits the bullet weight to 150 grains. Any heavier than that and you’ll lose stability, so while the .270 Winchester and WSM are both good, flat-shooting hunting cartridges, neither make a sound choice for today’s long-range shooting. Tighten that twist up to 1:8″ or 1:8.5″, and you’d certainly be able to push the 170-grain bullets, like the Berger Extreme Outer Limits line, with the truly high B.C. values.



    Perhaps the additional velocity of the .270 WSM variant appeals to you, but I feel that for bullets up to 150 fps, the good old .270 Win. gives all the velocity any rifleman would need, within sane hunting ranges. It’s been putting meat on the table and trophies on the wall for nearly a century, and based on sales figures, I don’t suspect that will change any time soon. Compound that with the feeding problems that the WSM line of cartridges can exhibit—I’ve seen a few rifles that feed reliably, but most are finicky at best—and the way the short, fat case quickly eats up magazine space, and I feel the original .270 Winchester makes a better design than does the WSM.






    In all honesty, with the exception of the .300 WSM (and even that seems to be on the wane) the WSM line seems destined for obscurity. Had Winchester changed the twist rate, allowing the .270 to run heavy bullets, we may never have heard of the 6.5 Creedmoor, but alas, history is history. Necking down the .30-03 to hold .277″ diameter bullets may have been the best decision Winchester engineers ever made, as it remains the most popular of the .30-06/.30-03 offspring, and it’ll take quite a bit to unseat the .270 Winchester.
    Last edited by Big Dummy; 08-28-2019 at 11:25 PM.
    I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them. — George Mason, during Virginia’s Convention to Ratify the Constitution (1788)

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Big Dummy For This Useful Post:

    MedicineBow (08-29-2019)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •