User Tag List

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27

Thread: Rotating food stock

  1. #21
    Alumni Member V.I.P Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsSocialCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 52.0%

    Northern Rivers's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Northern Rivers AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    20,820
    Thanks
    17,719
    Thanked: 16,584
    Blog Entries
    3
    Rep Power
    21474861
    Quote Originally Posted by Conservative Libertarian View Post
    I thank you.

    My diabetes has not impeded my ability to enjoy life, travel, etc. Managing it via diet and medication has enabled that to occur. Managing diabetes these days is easier than many years ago. back in the 80's, when I worked in a grocery store, There was this one section of a shelf that had the foods that diabetics could eat and that was it. Now, that section seldom exists. A diabetic can eat most normal foods provided that they educate themselves on what they can and can't eat and what amounts are acceptable. It can be done without writing everything down and mapping everything out. There are some rare cases where the diabetes is severe enough to warrant that. That used to be the norm 30+ years ago but is now the exception.
    Yep. That. It's really a no brainer, huh?
    If you don't practice...you'll sound like it. And, if you don't tune, your life will sound like it, too. Listen to the intervals. That's where it all hides from you.....

  2. #22
    Alumni Member V.I.P Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsSocialCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 52.0%

    Northern Rivers's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Northern Rivers AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    20,820
    Thanks
    17,719
    Thanked: 16,584
    Blog Entries
    3
    Rep Power
    21474861
    Quote Originally Posted by Liberty Monkey View Post
    I also recommend trying cannibalism it's an acquired taste but I like it
    Did ya hear about those cannibals that ate a Chinese guy? They were hungry a half hour later...

    If you don't practice...you'll sound like it. And, if you don't tune, your life will sound like it, too. Listen to the intervals. That's where it all hides from you.....

  3. #23
    Senior Member Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entry3 months registered
    Overall activity: 50.0%

    jirqoadai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    TEXAS
    Posts
    3,929
    Thanks
    2,999
    Thanked: 2,088
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    3599422
    Quote Originally Posted by Liberty Monkey View Post
    I also recommend trying cannibalism it's an acquired taste but I like it
    I hear the Tuscarora taste nothing like the Cherokee.

  4. #24
    I'm not mean-you're just acting like a sissy V.I.P Achievements:
    Social50000 Experience PointsVeteranCreated Blog entry
    Overall activity: 24.0%

    Conservative Libertarian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    10,795
    Thanks
    63,469
    Thanked: 14,561
    Blog Entries
    1
    Rep Power
    21474852
    Quote Originally Posted by Northern Rivers View Post
    Six months ago I took the hourly glucose tolerance blood tests...and...was diagnosed as borderline diabetic. Immediately...I went to a Dietician...listened to what I was doing to myself...took care of it. Now? Normal again.

    Basically...

    Whole grain cereals with fruit & soy milk for brekky.

    Salad for lunch.

    Fish & veges for dinner...red meat once a week.

    Snacks were my bugaboo. Now...nuts are the thing.

    I keep a lot of cherry tomatoes in the fridge. Every time I open the damned thing to see if something new has materialised in there since the last time I looked...I'll eat one or two.

    That's great! Keep it up but keep an eye on it. Don't let your guard down.

    Avoiding carbs seems to work best for me. I used to snack on nuts (great snack by the way) but had to stop because they were plugging up the works.

    My favorite snack is fruit but have to limit that as well because they really are carbs (i.e. natural sugar). They are great if you find your glucose levels dropping low. They get into your system faster than anything else but they don't last very long so, you have to follow up with something that maintains stable glucose levels for longer periods of time.

    Salads with some meat on them are a very safe meal for diabetics. Each meal really needs a balance of proteins, carbs, and fats to maintain stable glucose levels. As a general rule, to keep it simple, I tend to go for 1/3 meat, 1/3 raw veggies, 1/3 cooked veggies. I add some carbs in the form of bread or rice at breakfast and supper because that is when I prepare for the meals in advance by taking a shot that requires some carb intake.

    When I was first diagnosed 15 years ago, I almost did it by diet alone but something in my system was out of whack just enough to warrant taking a pill which lowered my body's resistance to my own insulin and worked with watching the diet. Unfortunately, diabetes is a progressive disease (Progressive = Bad). Things are managed well for a while and then the A1C's move up in spite of your efforts to control it. The doctor will usually recommend more dietary consultation and an increase in medication. The result is a slow escalation. I am now taking three pills and an injected medication (not insulin) on a daily basis to manage diabetes. My meals are timed per my glucose levels. Unless something can happen to actually reverse the progression of the disease, I will eventually be on insulin because my body won't be able to produce enough of it's own.

    Diabetes is extremely prevalent in this generation of my family. I have several cousins that are managing it at varying levels. Having our one cousin die from it 7 years ago was a real wake up call within the family. My paternal grandmother was diagnosed with it at age 60 and was able to make it to 92 while managing it. Our generation is getting hit about 20-30 years earlier.
    Last edited by Conservative Libertarian; 02-09-2019 at 08:37 AM.
    It takes a FAMILY to raise a child--Not Hitlery Klinton's Socialist, Anti-Family, Nanny-State...I mean, "Village".

    Islam is a religion of violence and terror as practiced by the Islamofascists. The Muslims that do speak out against terror are then terrorized by the Islamofascists and are ignored by the Lap Dog Media.

  5. #25
    Senior Member V.I.P Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsTagger Second ClassSocialVeteran
    Overall activity: 89.0%

    Big Dummy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    18,976
    Thanks
    38,787
    Thanked: 24,398
    Rep Power
    21474858
    Quote Originally Posted by Conservative Libertarian View Post
    That's great! Keep it up but keep an eye on it. Don't let your guard down.

    Avoiding carbs seems to work best for me. I used to snack on nuts (great snack by the way) but had to stop because they were plugging up the works.

    My favorite snack is fruit but have to limit that as well because they really are carbs (i.e. natural sugar). They are great if you find your glucose levels dropping low. They get into your system faster than anything else but they don't last very long so, you have to follow up with something that maintains stable glucose levels for longer periods of time.

    Salads with some meat on them are a very safe meal for diabetics. Each meal really needs a balance of proteins, carbs, and fats to maintain stable glucose levels. As a general rule, to keep it simple, I tend to go for 1/3 meat, 1/3 raw veggies, 1/3 cooked veggies. I add some carbs in the form of bread or rice at breakfast and supper because that is when I prepare for the meals in advance by taking a shot that requires some carb intake.

    When I was first diagnosed 15 years ago, I almost did it by diet alone but something in my system was out of whack just enough to warrant taking a pill which lowered my body's resistance to my own insulin and worked with watching the diet. Unfortunately, diabetes is a progressive disease (Progressive = Bad). Things are managed well for a while and then the A1C's move up in spite of your efforts to control it. The doctor will usually recommend more dietary consultation and an increase in medication. The result is a slow escalation. I am now taking three pills and an injected medication (not insulin) on a daily basis to manage diabetes. My meals are timed per my glucose levels. Unless something can happen to actually reverse the progression of the disease, I will eventually be on insulin because my body won't be able to produce enough of it's own.

    Diabetes is extremely prevalent in this generation of my family. I have several cousins that are managing it at varying levels. Having our one cousin die from it 7 years ago was a real wake up call within the family. My paternal grandmother was diagnosed with it at age 60 and was able to make it to 92 while managing it. Our generation is getting hit about 20-30 years earlier.

    Also @Northern Rivers eat right. The soy milk can trigger estrogen growth in men. Go almond or if you neeed to gain weight coconut.









    Are almonds beneficial for people with diabetes?

    Last reviewed Thu 15 Nov 2018
    By Jayne Leonard
    Reviewed by Katherine Marengo LDN, RD
    Table of contents
    Almonds and almond milk may provide several health benefits for people with diabetes. As these nuts are high in protein, healthful fats, and fiber but low in carbohydrates, they may increase satiety and aid blood sugar regulation and weight management.Diabetes is a long-term condition that affects how the body regulates blood sugar levels.
    Although snacking on almonds and drinking almond milk cannot reverse diabetes or substitute medical treatment, eating these nuts as part of a balanced diet may help a person manage their symptoms and reduce their risk of complications.
    In this article, we examine the potential benefits of eating almonds for people with diabetes. We also cover the nutritional content of almonds, how many almonds to eat a day, ways to eat more almonds, and other nuts that may be good for people with diabetes.
    Blood sugar control





    Almond milk is lower in carbohydrates and sugars than dairy milk.

    Several studies link eating tree nuts, which include almonds, with improved blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes.
    In a 2011 study involving 20 Chinese people with type 2 diabetes, the participants who ate 60 grams (g) of almonds daily experienced lower levels of fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar than those who ate a control diet.
    Almonds may also be beneficial for prediabetes, a condition in which a person's blood sugar levels are abnormally high but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with prediabetes have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
    The results of a 2010 study indicate that an almond-enriched diet, in which almonds contribute 20 percent of the total calories, may improve insulin sensitivity and cholesterol levels in people with prediabetes.
    In addition to eating whole nuts, people with diabetes may benefit from drinking almond milk. Unsweetened almond milk is lower in both carbohydrates and sugars than dairy milk:


    However, it is essential to check the nutrition label of almond milk as many brands contain added sugars.


    Heart health

    According to the American Heart Association (AHA), diabetes is one of the seven main controllable risk factors for heart disease. The AHA also report that people with diabetes are two to four times more likely than those without diabetes to die from heart disease.
    Some research suggests that almonds and other tree nuts may play a role in the prevention of heart disease.

    In a 2017 paper that analyzed data from three large studies, the researchers concluded that there was an association between the higher consumption of tree nuts and a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease.
    Other research from 2018 suggests that eating nuts, including almonds, may potentially reduce the risk of other heart problems, including irregular heartbeat and heart failure.
    Almonds may benefit the heart because they have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.
    They are also rich in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which might help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, which people often refer to as "bad" cholesterol.
    In addition, these healthful fats may help increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, or "good" cholesterol.
    Almond milk contains beneficial fats too, although in smaller amounts than whole nuts.
    Both whole almonds and almond milk are high in vitamin E. This vitamin protects cholesterol against oxidation. Research suggests that oxidized LDL cholesterol is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.
    A cup of almond milk contains 16.58 milligrams (mg) of vitamin E, which is slightly more than the average daily recommended intake of 15 mg for adults.
    Weight management





    For people with diabetes, a healthy body weight is important.

    Maintaining a healthy body weight is important for people with diabetes. Obesityincreases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and its complications, including heart disease. Weight loss may help people with prediabetes to delay or prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.
    Almonds are high in protein, fiber, and healthful fats. As a result, they may help people manage their weight by increasing feelings of fullness. A large body of research demonstrates that tree nuts can help people achieve and maintain a healthy weight.
    A 2017 systematic review of the effects that nuts have on human health reports that eating almonds does not cause weight gain, despite the high number of calories that they contain.
    A 2018 study suggests that people who eat nuts regularly have a lower risk of being overweight or obese and tend to gain less weight over time than those who do not eat nuts. This 5-year study looked at dietary and lifestyle data from over 373,000 people aged 25 to 70 years from 10 European countries.
    Almond milk is unlikely to contribute to satiety as it is low in protein. However, unsweetened almond milk is a low-calorie drink option, containing just 39 calories per cup in comparison with 102 calories per cup of low-fat cow's milk.




    Violence, naked force, has settled more issues in history than has any other factor, and the contrary opinion is wishful thinking at its worst. Nations and peoples who forget this basic truth have always paid for it with their lives and freedoms. Robert Heinlein

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Big Dummy For This Useful Post:

    Northern Rivers (02-09-2019)

  7. #26
    Senior Member Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 0%

    Dave37's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Kalifornia
    Posts
    4,142
    Thanks
    5,257
    Thanked: 3,170
    Blog Entries
    1
    Rep Power
    7150417
    My experience with canned goods is that exceeding their best by date doesn't mean the food has gone bad but it may not taste good. Same for dried beans, though hot sauce helps.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Dave37 For This Useful Post:

    Big Dummy (02-09-2019)

  9. #27
    Alumni Member V.I.P Achievements:
    50000 Experience PointsSocialCreated Blog entryVeteran
    Overall activity: 52.0%

    Northern Rivers's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Northern Rivers AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    20,820
    Thanks
    17,719
    Thanked: 16,584
    Blog Entries
    3
    Rep Power
    21474861
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Dummy View Post
    Also @Northern Rivers eat right. The soy milk can trigger estrogen growth in men. Go almond or if you neeed to gain weight coconut.







    Are almonds beneficial for people with diabetes?


    Last reviewed Thu 15 Nov 2018
    By Jayne Leonard
    Reviewed by Katherine Marengo LDN, RD
    Table of contents
    Almonds and almond milk may provide several health benefits for people with diabetes. As these nuts are high in protein, healthful fats, and fiber but low in carbohydrates, they may increase satiety and aid blood sugar regulation and weight management.Diabetes is a long-term condition that affects how the body regulates blood sugar levels.
    Although snacking on almonds and drinking almond milk cannot reverse diabetes or substitute medical treatment, eating these nuts as part of a balanced diet may help a person manage their symptoms and reduce their risk of complications.
    In this article, we examine the potential benefits of eating almonds for people with diabetes. We also cover the nutritional content of almonds, how many almonds to eat a day, ways to eat more almonds, and other nuts that may be good for people with diabetes.
    Blood sugar control





    Almond milk is lower in carbohydrates and sugars than dairy milk.

    Several studies link eating tree nuts, which include almonds, with improved blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes.
    In a 2011 study involving 20 Chinese people with type 2 diabetes, the participants who ate 60 grams (g) of almonds daily experienced lower levels of fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar than those who ate a control diet.
    Almonds may also be beneficial for prediabetes, a condition in which a person's blood sugar levels are abnormally high but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with prediabetes have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
    The results of a 2010 study indicate that an almond-enriched diet, in which almonds contribute 20 percent of the total calories, may improve insulin sensitivity and cholesterol levels in people with prediabetes.
    In addition to eating whole nuts, people with diabetes may benefit from drinking almond milk. Unsweetened almond milk is lower in both carbohydrates and sugars than dairy milk:


    However, it is essential to check the nutrition label of almond milk as many brands contain added sugars.


    Heart health

    According to the American Heart Association (AHA), diabetes is one of the seven main controllable risk factors for heart disease. The AHA also report that people with diabetes are two to four times more likely than those without diabetes to die from heart disease.
    Some research suggests that almonds and other tree nuts may play a role in the prevention of heart disease.

    In a 2017 paper that analyzed data from three large studies, the researchers concluded that there was an association between the higher consumption of tree nuts and a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease.
    Other research from 2018 suggests that eating nuts, including almonds, may potentially reduce the risk of other heart problems, including irregular heartbeat and heart failure.
    Almonds may benefit the heart because they have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.
    They are also rich in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which might help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, which people often refer to as "bad" cholesterol.
    In addition, these healthful fats may help increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, or "good" cholesterol.
    Almond milk contains beneficial fats too, although in smaller amounts than whole nuts.
    Both whole almonds and almond milk are high in vitamin E. This vitamin protects cholesterol against oxidation. Research suggests that oxidized LDL cholesterol is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.
    A cup of almond milk contains 16.58 milligrams (mg) of vitamin E, which is slightly more than the average daily recommended intake of 15 mg for adults.
    Weight management





    For people with diabetes, a healthy body weight is important.

    Maintaining a healthy body weight is important for people with diabetes. Obesityincreases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and its complications, including heart disease. Weight loss may help people with prediabetes to delay or prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.
    Almonds are high in protein, fiber, and healthful fats. As a result, they may help people manage their weight by increasing feelings of fullness. A large body of research demonstrates that tree nuts can help people achieve and maintain a healthy weight.
    A 2017 systematic review of the effects that nuts have on human health reports that eating almonds does not cause weight gain, despite the high number of calories that they contain.
    A 2018 study suggests that people who eat nuts regularly have a lower risk of being overweight or obese and tend to gain less weight over time than those who do not eat nuts. This 5-year study looked at dietary and lifestyle data from over 373,000 people aged 25 to 70 years from 10 European countries.
    Almond milk is unlikely to contribute to satiety as it is low in protein. However, unsweetened almond milk is a low-calorie drink option, containing just 39 calories per cup in comparison with 102 calories per cup of low-fat cow's milk.




    Almond tastes horrid to me. Coconut is verboden. And the amount of soy I have isn't much at all. I went through all this with the Quacks.....

    Thanks
    If you don't practice...you'll sound like it. And, if you don't tune, your life will sound like it, too. Listen to the intervals. That's where it all hides from you.....

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •