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View Full Version : Best and Worst Survival Kits



Calypso Jones
01-15-2015, 01:56 AM
http://www.survivaloutdoorskills.com/survival_kits_tips.htm

EvilObamaClone
01-15-2015, 02:15 AM
I've always carried a few of these items in my car just in case I've needed them myself, but he's right. Corporate survival kits suck and you should assemble one for yourself.

Calypso Jones
01-15-2015, 02:17 AM
I think so too.

Calypso Jones
01-15-2015, 02:18 AM
Let's talk about what's the best things to put in a kit.

I try to keep a working small flashlight, a knife, matches kept dry. Extra shoes, blankey and a pillow. lol

EvilObamaClone
01-15-2015, 03:46 AM
Water some extra food, a tent, twine, small saw, survival knife, flint, flares, a tarp, a small mirror, some extra clothes.

You see the tarp is more for the psychological aspect. Walls around a campsite help some people feel more secure about their surroundings.

Twine is for making traps and tying stuff together.

The food is non perishable, like MREs, and I like to keep a one month supply.

2cent
01-15-2015, 04:01 AM
You people crack me up. Just to what extent would things have to happen for you to leave home?
Just how much are you willing to give the jokers who are laughing their way all the way to the bank before you quite buying into this nonsense?

Rickity Plumber
01-15-2015, 04:42 AM
You people crack me up. Just to what extent would things have to happen for you to leave home?
Just how much are you willing to give the jokers who are laughing their way all the way to the bank before you quite buying into this nonsense?


I am not a "prepper" and even I know the advantages of keeping even a simple survival kit within reach.

During the blizzard of 1978 in NW Ohio, my younger cousin and I were cruising the roads looking and giving help to stranded motorists. Coming around a corner I failed to negotiate a huge snowdrift and my Dodge 4 wheel drive truck became 'high centered' and at that point I was going nowhere.

A farmer in a huge enclosed cab tractor somehow saw my lights and came and rescued my cousin and I. How close was I to needing extra blankets, warmth, and food? Fortunately he saw me and we were in his house only 20 - 30 minutes after becoming stuck.

However, that experience taught me a valuable lesson of which I have never forgotten mainly because if it was not for the farmer and his huge tractor, there is no telling how long we would have remained there. After that point, I always kept some kind of survival gear in my truck. The concrete jungles here in Florida would not require such a survival kit however, this would be the first thing I would put in a car or truck when chances could strand motorists.

And after all, I think a car is just a smaller example of what true life can throw at us. It would be unwise to ridicule others for being 'prepared'.

EvilObamaClone
01-15-2015, 05:14 AM
You people crack me up. Just to what extent would things have to happen for you to leave home?
Just how much are you willing to give the jokers who are laughing their way all the way to the bank before you quite buying into this nonsense?

I'm not a doomsday prepper. I don't hoard food and live in a bunker hoping and drooling over the day the world will end.

I have been without electricity for several days and was once stranded by the side of the road for an entire day. Those were not nice experiences and could have been far worse if I didn't have some things for those eventualities.

I also do believe in being prepared for an emergency. That is just good sense.

It's better to have something and not need it rather than to need it and not have it. That is just good sense.

A survival situation can happen at any time, and they happen really quick.

Karl
01-15-2015, 06:01 AM
Let's talk about what's the best things to put in a kit.

I try to keep a working small flashlight, a knife, matches kept dry. Extra shoes, blankey and a pillow. lol

Why are people so HUNG UP on "MATCHES" Calypso Jones....

A small "BIC" lighter is like having a Hundred Books of matches and if it gets wet they can DRY OFF

ALSO one has to understand the DYNAMICS of FIRE

ALL the matches and lighters in the world aint gonna HELP YA unless you actually know how to Start a FIRE unless ya happen to live in the ARID Southwest where a spark will catch anything cause its Bone Dry

Calypso Jones
01-15-2015, 09:43 AM
Watching Naked and Afraid, those people could use some matches.. they could use some CLOTHES.

Daily Bread
01-15-2015, 10:11 AM
Watching Naked and Afraid, those people could use some matches.. they could use some CLOTHES.
Next new show .
Clothed and Happy.
7315

Canadianeye
01-15-2015, 11:15 AM
I might have gotten pretty creative on this. Will test it out I think.

This is your standard pop can stove, which is pretty neat and easy to do.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RB1CB1CYhFU

Besides that, there are other options using a tuna can.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9HdTonXIGE

OK. Looking at the tuna can, and thinking a little outside the box...I am going to try one of these, since when I tried it, it did fit perfectly in a tuna can, and I don't have to do any holes at all, just unscrew, take off the seal....should work.

http://twominutetimeout.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/stainless-steel-kitchen-sink-strainer-drain-stopper-front-view-300x289.jpg

2cent
01-15-2015, 12:13 PM
I am not a "prepper" and even I know the advantages of keeping even a simple survival kit within reach.

During the blizzard of 1978 in NW Ohio, my younger cousin and I were cruising the roads looking and giving help to stranded motorists. Coming around a corner I failed to negotiate a huge snowdrift and my Dodge 4 wheel drive truck became 'high centered' and at that point I was going nowhere.

A farmer in a huge enclosed cab tractor somehow saw my lights and came and rescued my cousin and I. How close was I to needing extra blankets, warmth, and food? Fortunately he saw me and we were in his house only 20 - 30 minutes after becoming stuck.

However, that experience taught me a valuable lesson of which I have never forgotten mainly because if it was not for the farmer and his huge tractor, there is no telling how long we would have remained there. After that point, I always kept some kind of survival gear in my truck. The concrete jungles here in Florida would not require such a survival kit however, this would be the first thing I would put in a car or truck when chances could strand motorists.

And after all, I think a car is just a smaller example of what true life can throw at us. It would be unwise to ridicule others for being 'prepared'.


I'm not a doomsday prepper. I don't hoard food and live in a bunker hoping and drooling over the day the world will end.

I have been without electricity for several days and was once stranded by the side of the road for an entire day. Those were not nice experiences and could have been far worse if I didn't have some things for those eventualities.

I also do believe in being prepared for an emergency. That is just good sense.

It's better to have something and not need it rather than to need it and not have it. That is just good sense.

A survival situation can happen at any time, and they happen really quick.
I think the two of you misunderstood me. My own doing probably, due to the way I came off sounding.

Of course it's only common sense to be prepared in case of emergencies. Our home and vehicles are prepared for power outages and inclement weather. (A few winters back we were w/o power for 2 weeks. Towns nearby, for longer. The following summer we invested in a propane wall unit to replace the free-standing propane heater.)
My husband has taken our tractor out numerous times, (as have others), to clean off the hills of ice and tree limbs so people could get out. Our pick-up lost count of the number of vehicles its pulled out of ditches. No heroics; it's just what people do.
It's so commonplace that I don't understand people who don't treat it as commonplace.

So that's more of what I was referring to - those who buy into those ultra expensive gimmicks and/or all the hype that leads them to thinking they need to be prepared to build a shelter out in the middle of nowhere, and have enough supplies on them to last for weeks or months at a time.

Which begs the question that I asked in the first place: Just to what extent would things have to happen in order for you to decide that you must leave home?
And with all that stuff, why would you anyway? ("You" as in the general sense of the word.)

Common sense stuff, I get.
All the survivalist stuff, I do not. (I don't know that you'd believe me if I told you what our neighbors are up to w/their "super-secret" survivalist organization. But I'm thinking it'd crack you up, too.)

Capiche`?

EvilObamaClone
01-15-2015, 02:35 PM
Why are people so HUNG UP on "MATCHES" @Calypso Jones (http://thepoliticsforums.com/member.php?u=30)....

A small "BIC" lighter is like having a Hundred Books of matches and if it gets wet they can DRY OFF

ALSO one has to understand the DYNAMICS of FIRE

ALL the matches and lighters in the world aint gonna HELP YA unless you actually know how to Start a FIRE unless ya happen to live in the ARID Southwest where a spark will catch anything cause its Bone Dry

Okay, try starting a fire without them and see how long it takes, or even if you can do it.

You should know the techniques to starting fires without matches or lighters or anything like.

Try starting a fire with just the materials yous ee on the ground.

It's a lot more difficult and time consuming than those television shows would have you believe.

Toefoot
01-15-2015, 03:13 PM
Love this thread

Calypso Jones
01-15-2015, 03:44 PM
Okay, try starting a fire without them and see how long it takes, or even if you can do it.

You should know the techniques to starting fires without matches or lighters or anything like.

Try starting a fire with just the materials yous ee on the ground.

It's a lot more difficult and time consuming than those television shows would have you believe.

apparently cause they rarely get them started.

Canadianeye
01-15-2015, 03:46 PM
Vasoline cotton balls. Saw that the other day, and thought it was pretty damn smart. Keep them in a plastic baggie. I know a lot of you guys have ziplock baggies around your place, for sure. :smiley20:

Rickity Plumber
01-15-2015, 06:35 PM
I do not know if any of you preppers have heard of a fantstic fire starter which we called "light-or-not" but spoken as lighternot.

In Florida it is found in the woods and is pine logs that have been laying over in the debris. It is the wood that smells like turpentine and has a 'petrified' look to it. A good lighternot log can yield tons of fantastic fire starter. One match will light a sliver of lighternot and because it is so dense with this 'turpentine' smelling material, wet lighternot will even light easily. I understand that these particular pine logs, whether Slash pine or Longleaf pine (which are very similar) are not in all areas of the country.

Trips into the woods scouting for deer or hogs is a great way to find lighternot. A small hatchet can uncover mother loads of the stuff.


https://d3axvdqkyu09xk.cloudfront.net/attachments/fatlighter4-jpg.27939/

freyasman
01-15-2015, 07:04 PM
http://www.survivaloutdoorskills.com/survival_kits_tips.htm

Pocketknife, Zippo lighter, Glock 32 and a spare mag, passport, and a few grand in cash..... all you'll ever need. :thumbsup20:

EvilObamaClone
01-16-2015, 02:27 AM
apparently cause they rarely get them started.

I'm not so sure. I have been able to get them started using those techniques, but a lot of the time they do fail and it is a difficult thing to do so.

But not impossible.

Robert Urbanek
01-17-2015, 06:28 PM
In my 64 years of living in California, the only emergencies I've faced are power outages that lasted no longer than four hours. My emergency kit is a bag containing toiletries, first aid supplies, a flashlight, a battery-operated radio, three cans of V-8 juice, two packets of dried fruit, and four small bottles of water. I recycle the perishable supplies every four months.

Crutmauler
01-17-2015, 07:53 PM
I am not a "prepper" and even I know the advantages of keeping even a simple survival kit within reach.

During the blizzard of 1978 in NW Ohio, my younger cousin and I were cruising the roads looking and giving help to stranded motorists. Coming around a corner I failed to negotiate a huge snowdrift and my Dodge 4 wheel drive truck became 'high centered' and at that point I was going nowhere.

A farmer in a huge enclosed cab tractor somehow saw my lights and came and rescued my cousin and I. How close was I to needing extra blankets, warmth, and food? Fortunately he saw me and we were in his house only 20 - 30 minutes after becoming stuck.

However, that experience taught me a valuable lesson of which I have never forgotten mainly because if it was not for the farmer and his huge tractor, there is no telling how long we would have remained there. After that point, I always kept some kind of survival gear in my truck. The concrete jungles here in Florida would not require such a survival kit however, this would be the first thing I would put in a car or truck when chances could strand motorists.

And after all, I think a car is just a smaller example of what true life can throw at us. It would be unwise to ridicule others for being 'prepared'.I remember the blizzard of '78 in NW Ohio. I was 11 years old and so hungry, cold and thirsty. That really sucked. We were burning furniture and even the kitchen cabinets and bedroom doors. Any wood we could find. That's why I'm a prepper to this day. My brother and I went to check on an elderly neighbor and the snow drifts were higher than the utility poles. Not even snowmobiles could get through it. And when we finally got there we found her dead.


But anyhow, here's a small bit of advice. Keep a Zippo lighter in your kit and put a piece of bicycle innertube around it to keep the wick and flint from getting wet and also keep the fluid from evaporating.

Pregnar Kraps
01-17-2015, 07:58 PM
In my 64 years of living in California, the only emergencies I've faced are power outages that lasted no longer than four hours. My emergency kit is a bag containing toiletries, first aid supplies, a flashlight, a battery-operated radio, three cans of V-8 juice, two packets of dried fruit, and four small bottles of water. I recycle the perishable supplies every four months.

The BIG one is overdue.

2cent
01-18-2015, 08:37 AM
I remember the blizzard of '78 in NW Ohio. I was 11 years old and so hungry, cold and thirsty. That really sucked. We were burning furniture and even the kitchen cabinets and bedroom doors. Any wood we could find. That's why I'm a prepper to this day. My brother and I went to check on an elderly neighbor and the snow drifts were higher than the utility poles. Not even snowmobiles could get through it. And when we finally got there we found her dead.
Most excellent! :roflmao:



But anyhow, here's a small bit of advice. Keep a Zippo lighter in your kit and put a piece of bicycle innertube around it to keep the wick and flint from getting wet and also keep the fluid from evaporating.
A good, tight pair of earmuffs works well for that, too.

Toefoot
01-18-2015, 09:05 AM
Vasoline cotton balls. Saw that the other day, and thought it was pretty damn smart. Keep them in a plastic baggie. I know a lot of you guys have ziplock baggies around your place, for sure. :smiley20:

Skip the ziplock bags, they will fail. Use Big Gulp straws. Cut the straw in three equal parts. With a pair of pliers pinch the open end of the straw just a little of the plastic exposed, with a bic lighter melt the end.

Take your mixed cotton and vaseline and insert it into the straw with a chop stick, packing it in. Once complete pinch the end of the straw with the pliers leaving just a little of th plastic exposed and melt the other end with the bic lighter sealing it completely.

Canadianeye
01-18-2015, 09:06 AM
Skip the ziplock bags, they will fail. Use Big Gulp straws. Cut the straw in three equal parts. With a pair of pliers pinch the open end of the straw just a little of the plastic exposed, with a bic lighter melt the end.

Take your mixed cotton and vaseline and insert it into the straw with a chop stick, packing it in. Once complete pinch the end of the straw with the pliers leaving just a little of th plastic exposed and melt the other end with the bic lighter sealing it completely.

Brilliant. Thank you.

Rickity Plumber
01-18-2015, 09:46 AM
I remember the blizzard of '78 in NW Ohio. I was 11 years old and so hungry, cold and thirsty. That really sucked. We were burning furniture and even the kitchen cabinets and bedroom doors. Any wood we could find. That's why I'm a prepper to this day. My brother and I went to check on an elderly neighbor and the snow drifts were higher than the utility poles. Not even snowmobiles could get through it. And when we finally got there we found her dead.


But anyhow, here's a small bit of advice. Keep a Zippo lighter in your kit and put a piece of bicycle innertube around it to keep the wick and flint from getting wet and also keep the fluid from evaporating.

You must have been in a rural area. We lived in Swanton, Ohio (west of Toledo). To expand a little on snowdrift formation, I remember east and west running roads were kept somewhat clear because of winds from the east. However, north and south running roads were the ones that got loaded with drifts because of brush along the roads, fences, and even snow fences. A lone telephone pole made drifts higher than a car along these roads.

This is what happened to me, traveling east I took a left turn and then was headed north, right into a drift causing me to become stuck on top of a drift. The farmer that rescued my cousin and I lived on an east/west road and saw me drive by causing concern for him that I learned later. This was at night and I remember I could almost feel the wind still inside the closed cab of my truck. There had to be gale force winds that night.

Valuable lesson for me. One that I will never forget.

Katzndogz
02-25-2015, 10:44 AM
Walking Dead survival kit

http://www.shopthewalkingdead.com/walking-dead-survival-kit/details/29322111

JustPassinThru
02-25-2015, 12:06 PM
In my 64 years of living in California, the only emergencies I've faced are power outages that lasted no longer than four hours. My emergency kit is a bag containing toiletries, first aid supplies, a flashlight, a battery-operated radio, three cans of V-8 juice, two packets of dried fruit, and four small bottles of water. I recycle the perishable supplies every four months.

Normalcy bias.

It's never happened, in your memory...so the tendency is to think it cannot happen or is unlikely to happen.

The Donners thought that, too, no doubt.

JustPassinThru
02-25-2015, 12:09 PM
Prepackaged kits...at the VERY best, they're a compromise.

What is useful to me might be useless to others. I will need a heavy overcoat. An Arizona resident, not so much.

The food that would serve a young person well, is bad news for me. Example, an energy bar. Keep the young person going. Send a diabetic into a bad situation.

Those are helpful only as guidelines in constructing your own.

usfan
02-25-2015, 12:13 PM
I has to be based on common sense, not any contrived 'list'. it depends on where you are, the conditions expected, & what level of exposure you face. My list would be very different in the rockies than s. calif.

Robert Urbanek
02-27-2015, 09:38 PM
From the linked article:

Provide you add a few more survival items to it like some matches, a knife, flashlight, condom, water purification tablets, fishing line & hooks, etc.

I'm still trying to think of the disaster scenario in which having one condom would be useful.

On second thought, I notice a condom is included in my all-time favorite survival kit:

https://video.search.yahoo.com/video/play;_ylt=AwrTccp8KvFUfFsA.jMPxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTB0aW RtNmFyBHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2dxMQR2dGlkA1lIUzAwMV8x?p=d r+strangelove+survival+kit+contents&tnr=21&vid=D7EC9C982331C085E078D7EC9C982331C085E078&l=56&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts3.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DUN.6 08043519922277698%26pid%3D15.1&sigi=11roqjhnr&rurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Dv PwW7RaPO_g&sigr=11b0smogt&tt=b&tit=Major+Kong+-+Survival+Kit+Contents+Check&sigt=118hfs7dg&back=https%3A%2F%2Fsearch.yahoo.com%2Fyhs%2Fsearch %3Fp%3Ddr%2Bstrangelove%2Bsurvival%2Bkit%2Bcontent s%26type%3Datt_pc_homerun_portal%26fr%3Dyfp-t-900%26hsimp%3Dyhs-att_001%26hspart%3Datt%26ei%3DUTF-8&sigb=14o38t4m5&hspart=att&hsimp=yhs-att_001

Englishpaul
04-24-2015, 06:19 AM
survival kits tend to be a personal thing based on ones location and possible events, but I suppose a ready made kit is at least better than no kit at all!!